Doubt or question

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6
Posts116Likes36Joined19/9/2019LocationSão Paulo / BR
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Portuguese
Learning English, French, Italian, Spanish

Once I was in a class and raised my hand saying "I have a doubt". The teacher laughed and replied "now you'll talk about God!". I learned I should have said "I have a question". It was British context. Is it the same for American English?

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#1
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Posts1035Likes661Joined18/3/2018LocationTH
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English
Learning Swahili

Yes: "I have a question".

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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#2
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Posts116Likes36Joined19/9/2019LocationSão Paulo / BR
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Portuguese
Learning English, French, Italian, Spanish

leosmith wrote:
Yes: "I have a question".
Thanks! This one is very tricky for Portuguese speakers, my students say it a lot and are normally not convinced when I tell them not to use "doubt" in this situation, because it would be a natural translation from our mother tongue.

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#3
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Posts1035Likes661Joined18/3/2018LocationTH
Native
English
Learning Swahili

Valeria.Fontes wrote:
my students say it a lot and are normally not convinced when I tell them not to use "doubt" in this situation, because it would be a natural translation from our mother tongue.

That's interesting. In Korean, although you can say "I have a question" it's more common to say "I'm curious (about something)".

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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#4
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Posts35Likes31Joined20/9/2019LocationRizal / PH
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Tagalog
Learning English, Russian

They do? In English that sounds like making a statement than asking a question although I'm sure they already understood that's the intent of saying they are curious about something. Good to know if ever I study in Korea. :)

"Не волнуйтесь"

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#5
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Posts69Likes46Joined17/9/2019LocationMexico City / MX
Native
Spanish
Learning English, German

I can't believe I have been using "doubt" all this time! It must be a really common problem for native Spanish speakers because we are used to saying "I have a doubt" in Spanish when we raise our hand in class. Good to know!

Language shapes our view of the world.

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#6
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Posts116Likes36Joined19/9/2019LocationSão Paulo / BR
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Portuguese
Learning English, French, Italian, Spanish

ZairaI.Uranga wrote:
I can't believe I have been using "doubt" all this time! :laughing: It must be a really common problem for native Spanish speakers because we are used to saying "I have a doubt" in Spanish when we raise our hand in class. Good to know!
Actually I've raised this doubt - oops, question - in "other than English" forum, because I was suspicious Spanish speakers have the same translation issue.

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#7
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Posts61Likes39Joined26/9/2019LocationKR
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Korean

In America, when you use the word, "Doubt," for example,


A: "I think Earth is the shape of square."

B: "I doubt it."


And plus, I think they don't use a sentence like "I have a doubt." Most likely it is supposed to be "I have a question." :)

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#8
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Posts116Likes36Joined19/9/2019LocationSão Paulo / BR
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Portuguese
Learning English, French, Italian, Spanish

JaeHong.S wrote:
In America, when you use the word, "Doubt," for example,
A: "I think Earth is the shape of square."
B: "I doubt it."
And plus, I think they don't use a sentence like "I have a doubt." Most likely it is supposed to be "I have a question." :)
I don't doubt it at all! The Earth is definitely round, haha!

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#9
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