Past Perfect

level
6
Posts116Likes36Joined19/9/2019LocationSão Paulo / BR
Native
Portuguese
Learning English, French, Italian, Spanish

I was told by a native speaker that Past Perfect is not used in everyday life conversations. Is it so?

For example: "I went to Europe last year, but I had been there before". This person told me a native would prefer to say "I went to Europe last year, but I was there before". 

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#1
level
33
Posts1034Likes661Joined18/3/2018LocationTH
Native
English
Learning Swahili

Of those two sentences, I prefer the first one, but I'd change "I had" to "I'd" in colloquial speech. 

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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1
#2
level
15
Posts61Likes39Joined26/9/2019LocationKR
Native
Korean

I would say, grammatically, "I went to Europe last year, but I had been there before" this is the right one. However, when you don't need a perfect grammar, you can always use like "I went to Europe last year, but I was there before." They are both meaning same and this one's used more often :)

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#3
level
5
Posts48Likes48Joined23/9/2019LocationNovi Sad / RS
Native
Serbian
Learning Danish, English, Russian
I was told by a native speaker that Past Perfect is not used in everyday life conversations. Is it so?

Honestly, from my experience with native speakers, it really depends on the speaker themself. Some use it very often and some don't, but it definitely doesn't sound weird when they do. My British and Australian friends use it all the time, the one American guy I know doesn't use it as much. That's probably the reason why I read the first sentence in a British accent and the second in an American one haha.

JEG KAN IKKE FORSTÅ

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#4
level
4
Posts35Likes31Joined20/9/2019LocationRizal / PH
Native
Tagalog
Learning English, Russian

Kosta.Cirkovic wrote:
I was told by a native speaker that Past Perfect is not used in everyday life conversations. Is it so?
Honestly, from my experience with native speakers, it really depends on the speaker themself. Some use it very often and some don't, but it definitely doesn't sound weird when they do. My British and Australian friends use it all the time, the one American guy I know doesn't use it as much. That's probably the reason why I read the first sentence in a British accent and the second in an American one haha.


Ha ha it's good that you have lots of other friends sharing the same language but different accents and usage. You get to have a different perspective on how they use some of the sentences. As for me, I recall using both versions. Not sure how I come up with different usage though.

"Не волнуйтесь"

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1
#5
level
5
Posts48Likes48Joined23/9/2019LocationNovi Sad / RS
Native
Serbian
Learning Danish, English, Russian

jpormento wrote:
Kosta.Cirkovic wrote:
I was told by a native speaker that Past Perfect is not used in everyday life conversations. Is it so?
Honestly, from my experience with native speakers, it really depends on the speaker themself. Some use it very often and some don't, but it definitely doesn't sound weird when they do. My British and Australian friends use it all the time, the one American guy I know doesn't use it as much. That's probably the reason why I read the first sentence in a British accent and the second in an American one haha.

Ha ha it's good that you have lots of other friends sharing the same language but different accents and usage. You get to have a different perspective on how they use some of the sentences. As for me, I recall using both versions. Not sure how I come up with different usage though.


Haha, yeah, that's the perks of meeting people who play the same video games in my travels. I'm sure they caught at least a bit of my Serbian accent as well. :D

JEG KAN IKKE FORSTÅ

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#6
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