Homeschooling

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Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
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Wow. I'm really interested in home-schooling my son too, but I don't know how and where. Would you tell me more about it please?

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#1
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Posts385Likes192Joined11/7/2018LocationManila / PH
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Tagalog
Learning English, Korean

Rai.S. wrote:
Wow. I'm really interested in home-schooling my son too, but I don't know how and where. Would you tell me more about it please?


There are several homeschool programs you can choose from. With my daughter though, we opted not to go with any of those and just make her take the ALS (Alternative Learning System) test when she's ready to go back. The last time she was in school was in 4th grade. We'll probably make her take it in time for Grade 7.


Our struggle with her is that when she went to school, she knew like 10 Tagalog words. So for a lot of the lessons, she'd just sit there not understanding what the teacher was saying. She's pretty shy too so she's not the type who'd speak up and ask the teacher to say it in English. By the time she was in Grade 4, she was struggling so bad with Civics and Filipino that she'd cry every time it's time to go to school. She gets bullied too. Once, a couple of boys locked her in the bathroom. When she got out, she called them pathetic and useless. A teacher heard and she was the one called to the principal's office for using bad words. Lol. Needless to say, they got an earful from me and my husband.


We've already tried several private schoosl in our area. We even enrolled her in public school so she'll be immersed with people speaking Tagalog. The teacher called us after two days asking us to move her to a private school. She said "I'm a Filipino major. I can't teach in English, ma'am."


So now I create lessons for her. Her lessons are a mishmash of things. For Filipino, she's learning vocab (months in Tagalog, counting, animals, etc). For English, she's working on high school level material. For Science, she's still on Grace 3 level but we'd be moving that up soon. Civics, she's on Grace 5 material. :)

--

ikay

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#2
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Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
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Thanks a lot for enlightening me, Ikay. I could imagine you're a supermom. I wonder how you manage to be a wife, a mom and a teacher all in one.


Children are totally different these days. How I wish your daughter would be able to go back soon and forget those past experiences.


What?!!! Well, the teacher or school administration deserved whatever they heard from you. They should never tolerate bullying in their school. And how can you not call someone pathetic and useless when they locked you up in the bathroom?!


I'll check the link above and see if it's possible for my son. He's 4 years old. I'm a bit scared of letting him go to school because he might be influenced by others. Like I said, children these days are different. As for my son, he says "bad 'yon" when he hears someone saying "bastos, loko, hoy, uy, bwisit." LOL

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#3
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Posts385Likes192Joined11/7/2018LocationManila / PH
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Actually, I had to quit my full time job because I just can't juggle my schedule anymore. I feel bad for my husband because our budget's resting solely on his shoulders now but we both have been working non-stop for 10+years. We thought it'd be good for the kids to have parents instead of maids for a change. :P


As for your kids these days, I think it's more of the parents too. My kid had a friend who kept stealing her toys so I told her to not play with that kid anymore. We weren't rude or anything. I just told her to tell the kid they're not allowed to play together anymore. That kid's parents had the balls to go to my house and confront me because "we're discriminating against them because they're poor". That and her kid only takes stuff we can afford to buy anyway. Insert facepalm here. 


I have two girls and my eldest is VERY outspoken. She's the one who'd get in people's faces if they bother her. When she was in 3rd grade, she had a classmate who kept teasing her "Gaby (Gabi) Gulay". This kid teased her for weeks. Then my kid snapped and confronted her. She asked the kid: Why are you like that? Don't your parents talk to you? Do you have a bad home? Don't your parents teach you good manners? Is that why you're poor?


Granted, the poor part is a bit foul but I still think it's incredulous that she's the one who got reprimanded and not the kid who teased her for weeks.

--

ikay

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#4
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Posts270Likes101Joined15/9/2018LocationSkopje / MK
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ikaymoreno wrote:
Rai.S. wrote:
Wow. I'm really interested in home-schooling my son too, but I don't know how and where. Would you tell me more about it please?

There are several homeschool programs you can choose from. With my daughter though, we opted not to go with any of those and just make her take the ALS (Alternative Learning System) test when she's ready to go back. The last time she was in school was in 4th grade. We'll probably make her take it in time for Grade 7.
Our struggle with her is that when she went to school, she knew like 10 Tagalog words. So for a lot of the lessons, she'd just sit there not understanding what the teacher was saying. She's pretty shy too so she's not the type who'd speak up and ask the teacher to say it in English. By the time she was in Grade 4, she was struggling so bad with Civics and Filipino that she'd cry every time it's time to go to school. She gets bullied too. Once, a couple of boys locked her in the bathroom. When she got out, she called them pathetic and useless. A teacher heard and she was the one called to the principal's office for using bad words. Lol. Needless to say, they got an earful from me and my husband.
We've already tried several private schoosl in our area. We even enrolled her in public school so she'll be immersed with people speaking Tagalog. The teacher called us after two days asking us to move her to a private school. She said "I'm a Filipino major. I can't teach in English, ma'am."
So now I create lessons for her. Her lessons are a mishmash of things. For Filipino, she's learning vocab (months in Tagalog, counting, animals, etc). For English, she's working on high school level material. For Science, she's still on Grace 3 level but we'd be moving that up soon. Civics, she's on Grace 5 material. :)


I feel like homeschooling programs are good for certain individuals, but it should not be the norm or something that's for everyone.


I trust you made the right choice with your daughter 

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#5
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Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
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ikaymoreno wrote:

Actually, I had to quit my full time job because I just can't juggle my schedule anymore. I feel bad for my husband because our budget's resting solely on his shoulders now but we both have been working non-stop for 10+years. We thought it'd be good for the kids to have parents instead of maids for a change. :P

As for your kids these days, I think it's more of the parents too. My kid had a friend who kept stealing her toys so I told her to not play with that kid anymore. We weren't rude or anything. I just told her to tell the kid they're not allowed to play together anymore. That kid's parents had the balls to go to my house and confront me because "we're discriminating against them because they're poor". That and her kid only takes stuff we can afford to buy anyway. Insert facepalm here.

I have two girls and my eldest is VERY outspoken. She's the one who'd get in people's faces if they bother her. When she was in 3rd grade, she had a classmate who kept teasing her "Gaby (Gabi) Gulay". This kid teased her for weeks. Then my kid snapped and confronted her. She asked the kid: Why are you like that? Don't your parents talk to you? Do you have a bad home? Don't your parents teach you good manners? Is that why you're poor?

Granted, the poor part is a bit foul but I still think it's incredulous that she's the one who got reprimanded and not the kid who teased her for weeks.


I totally agree. I used to work overseas, but decided not to go back at the moment to take care of my son. My son never had a "yaya". As much as possible, we only want family members to take care of him.


I feel like your kids are the ones being discriminated here. Facepalm to them.

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#6
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Posts385Likes192Joined11/7/2018LocationManila / PH
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My husband and I have always worked and we're noticing how...different the kids are now that I get to stay at home with them. We had to adjust a lot cost-wise but the kids are all teh better for it.

--

ikay

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#7
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Posts270Likes101Joined15/9/2018LocationSkopje / MK
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Rai.S. wrote:
ikaymoreno wrote:
Actually, I had to quit my full time job because I just can't juggle my schedule anymore. I feel bad for my husband because our budget's resting solely on his shoulders now but we both have been working non-stop for 10+years. We thought it'd be good for the kids to have parents instead of maids for a change. :P
As for your kids these days, I think it's more of the parents too. My kid had a friend who kept stealing her toys so I told her to not play with that kid anymore. We weren't rude or anything. I just told her to tell the kid they're not allowed to play together anymore. That kid's parents had the balls to go to my house and confront me because "we're discriminating against them because they're poor". That and her kid only takes stuff we can afford to buy anyway. Insert facepalm here.
I have two girls and my eldest is VERY outspoken. She's the one who'd get in people's faces if they bother her. When she was in 3rd grade, she had a classmate who kept teasing her "Gaby (Gabi) Gulay". This kid teased her for weeks. Then my kid snapped and confronted her. She asked the kid: Why are you like that? Don't your parents talk to you? Do you have a bad home? Don't your parents teach you good manners? Is that why you're poor?
Granted, the poor part is a bit foul but I still think it's incredulous that she's the one who got reprimanded and not the kid who teased her for weeks.

I totally agree. I used to work overseas, but decided not to go back at the moment to take care of my son. My son never had a "yaya". As much as possible, we only want family members to take care of him.
I feel like your kids are the ones being discriminated here. Facepalm to them.

How old was your kid when you worked overseas? Was he living with you in a new culture and country or did he stay back? 

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#8
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dragonsky wrote:

How old was your kid when you worked overseas? Was he living with you in a new culture and country or did he stay back?


He was 1 1/2 when I left and he stayed back.

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#9
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Posts385Likes192Joined11/7/2018LocationManila / PH
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Rai.S. wrote:
dragonsky wrote:
How old was your kid when you worked overseas? Was he living with you in a new culture and country or did he stay back?

He was 1 1/2 when I left and he stayed back.


This was my sister's dilemma too. If she works abroad, they'd have a better life. If she stays, she can be sure her kids gets the care she wants her to have. Sigh.

--

ikay

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#10
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I know a friend that went to work overseas and she started a family there, I can't imagine how tough would it be if she had a kid back home, it sounds like a hell of a dilemma 

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#11
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ikaymoreno wrote:

This was my sister's dilemma too. If she works abroad, they'd have a better life. If she stays, she can be sure her kids gets the care she wants her to have. Sigh.


Totally right. Then you'll tell yourself, "If I was just there..." It's so frustrating sometimes.

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#12
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dragonsky wrote:

I know a friend that went to work overseas and she started a family there, I can't imagine how tough would it be if she had a kid back home, it sounds like a hell of a dilemma


It would be better living with the family abroad. But it's a lot better living in the Philippines with the same compensation other countries give.

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#13
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My husband was a foreign exchange student and he said studying abroad helped broaden the way he sees the world. We have no plans of migrating but I'm hoping my kids can qualify for some forex program. When I was in PNU, we had the option to study in France, Spain, Japan, Canada, or Korea. We just had to take an exam and add the language to our current load.

--

ikay

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#14
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Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
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Wow. How is that? And you learn the languages through self-studying?

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