Language Learning and Culture

Ranger
Posts363Likes 174Joined 10/7/2018LocationBinan City / PH
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Tagalog
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According to this article, being open to understand the culture of a place that speaks the language that we are studying can greatly help us in our second language acquisition. I think this pertains more to the immersion phase. Aside from perhaps equating their culture to the etimology of their language etc., by knowing, understanding and respecting their culture, we can really gain native friends, who can graciously help us with our learning.


https://www.strategiesinlanguagelearning.com/language-learning-and-culture/

Edzky-18

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#1
Ranger
Posts458Likes 274Joined 8/7/2018LocationAlmeria / ES
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Other Arabic - Egyptian, French, German, Spanish

100% agree 

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#2
Ranger
Posts298Likes 159Joined 6/10/2018LocationLagos / NG
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Language and culture are so intricately entwined together, I don't think you can separate one from the other. It makes sense for one to totally immerse himself in the entirety of the language he's learning, which includes the culture of the people.

Kevwe A.

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#3
Ranger
Posts201Likes 74Joined 5/6/2018LocationLapu-lapu / PH
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Cebuano, Tagalog
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Absolutely! I would not have an interest to learn the specific language if I don't really like/love the culture first. :)

Charlyn Amoin

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#4
Elf
Posts119Likes 39Joined 10/12/2018Location
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Charlyn wrote:
Absolutely! I would not have an interest to learn the specific language if I don't really like/love the culture first. :)


And if SomewhatGeekyPolyglot would post an answer to this thread any day, he would tell you that to him, liking or loving the culture isn't a prerequisite at all. He just might learn any language that has a place in his personal life, no matter what he likes or doesn't like about any particular culture. 

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#5
Ent
Posts821Likes 500Joined 18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
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Interesting article, thanks for linking to it. 

I noticed a certain quality of humility in his speech which is evident in most Japanese when they speak. It comes through the way the language is spoken, a certain attitude that pervades the speech, something that many if not most second language speakers of Japanese from western countries don’t seem to master.

This is all about politeness levels, and it can be learned like any other aspect of a language. I prefer to think of it this way - you have to be open to speak the language the way that natives speak it. This means learning from conversation, which I'd like to point out, almost everyone voted against. So you can be as culturally open as you want, but if you aren't basing a good portion of your studies on actual conversation, you won't talk like native speakers. Sure, you might pick up some good points here and there, but you're going to miss a lot.

They noted that some cultural groups have more difficulty than others in picking up Canadian.

Omg, did they really go there? Canadian is a language now? Yikes.

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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#6
Ranger
Posts458Likes 274Joined 8/7/2018LocationAlmeria / ES
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Dialects surely?

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#7
Ranger
Posts385Likes 190Joined 11/7/2018LocationManila / PH
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I remember seeing a clip before where they referred to "dialects of English". Maybe that's what Canadian English is.

--

ikay

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#8
Elf
Posts142Likes 113Joined 4/10/2018Location
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I think the article makes some overall valid points, though the points that it makes are not unique to language learning, i.e. being more open, receptive, and learning other cultures. 


Having said that, it really depends on the language for me. As with SGP, I learn French because I like to read. At this point, I don't care that much about French culture. I do use the "learn the language, learn the culture" approach for other languages. 

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#9
Ranger
Posts363Likes 174Joined 10/7/2018LocationBinan City / PH
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Charlyn wrote:

Absolutely! I would not have an interest to learn the specific language if I don't really like/love the culture first. :)


I understand you here, maybe it's in your persona to like/love the culture first before taking interest in learning their language. Though for some people, its the other way around. 

Edzky-18

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#10
Elf
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edz.conde wrote:
I understand you here, maybe it's in your persona to like/love the culture first before taking interest in learning their language. Though for some people, its the other way around.


And to some others, it could even be a mix of these two.

Like loving some aspects of the culture leading to learning something about the language, and also vice-versa.


Both possibilities already have applied to me, too, more than just once or twice. And they still do.

______________________________

SGP = _____ _____ ____ (currently remixing my nickname)

My Youtube channel (EN, DE, ...)

Alpha Centauri Style Music (on Soundcloud)

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#11
Ranger
Posts458Likes 274Joined 8/7/2018LocationAlmeria / ES
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I do think understanding the culture plays a big part in certain languages. How to speak to elders differs quite often. Also I wouldn't speak in the same manner to a Bedouin chief as I do with winen in Egypt and I don't just mean the words changing from masculine to Feminine

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#12
Ranger
Posts270Likes 101Joined 15/9/2018LocationSkopje / MK
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I am sure that knowing and being interested in a certain culture and the way of living in that country would help with learning a certain language, but honestly I think that it's only a slight edge for people willing to get to an "A+" level of knowledge. I think you can definitely learn the language if you learn on "autopilot" just learning the necessary things without being to immersed in the "backstory" of the language/country/culture 

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#13
Ranger
Posts363Likes 174Joined 10/7/2018LocationBinan City / PH
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I think that it's only a slight edge for people willing to get to an "A+" level of knowledge. I think you can definitely learn the language if you learn on "autopilot" just learning the necessary things without being to immersed in the "backstory" of the language/country/culture 

[/quote]


I need to say that we have a different view on this. Though I fully respect your opinion, but I wouldn't say it a "slight edge", that is, my point now is irregardless of the article abovementioned. In my point of view, knowing and understanding "Culture" is a "big plus" in order to attain a higher degree of language level. As many linguists claim, you cannot trully acquire a "higher level" of the second language without really immersing yourself to the people speaking it. It's way too different if you just focus in an "autopilot" type of learning. Though "autopiloting" may help the learners, but if your goal is for the "A+" level, knowing their culture is a "big help". And when I say "culture", its not just about the "backstory" of the place, its more about the current social practices, the beliefs, the behavior, the set of values and the way of thinking of the people living in that country.


Having said this, I would also like to add that knowing the culture is not a pre-requisite to language learning but you can never ever be proficient in the second language without "direct contact" with their culture, so it's a " big edge" if you get to understand them (people talking the language you are learning).

Edzky-18

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