Spaced Repition Software (SRS)

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Posts114Likes79Joined8/10/2018LocationPH
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Hey guys, anyone of you use SRS (in particular Anki) as a means of quickly jamming information to your memory? Research has proven that it is a quick way to learn AND retain information. 


Look at this Wikipedia article, it mentions the many benefits of this and much more. I guess the reason why I am asking is because I have used it to some success when I started learning Japanese. Thing is, it got boring real quick... and I quit because of it. 


Do you think it's best to try again? I mean I guess I can go the usual route of reading books and such but idk. Looking forward to your replies :)


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Thanks for sharing - interesting write-up on Wikipedia. 


I am sure the science of it is sound, but I find that I don't retain the information that well after say... 3 months, even if I am consistent within the three months. 


Sometimes, if I really want to remember something, there is an interesting method that I learned from reading Jonathan Spence's The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci (The book is not really about memory methods, but a history book about a Jesuit priest in China during the Qing Dynasty). Matteo Ricci basically associates new information, in this case, Chinese, with something that he already knows, and then he files that information away, in a mental library, that is mentally anchored in a building. 


The method is actually quite time-consuming, because you need to make that piece of information vivid, and associate it as many qualities as possible with your present knowledge (reason why I don't use it most of the time). But having said that, I find that it sticks a lot more than simple spaced repetition.

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Cool, thanks for the reply. So you're basically saying to make a mental image of the new word so that it can stick to your longterm memory right? Interesting, I might look into that. 


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Posts927Likes581Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
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Mel.Palogan wrote:
it got boring real quick... and I quit because of it.

You aren't alone. I blogged about it here:

The dangers of overusing SRS.


meifeng wrote:
Memory Palace

Just curious - what did you use it to memorize? That particular mnemonic was invented to memorize entire books worth of knowledge, so I find it overkill for my purposes. I use a combination of mnemonics and repetition to get vocabulary and grammar to stick.

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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leosmith wrote:
Just curious - what did you use it to memorize?


Usually students' names - I'm terrible with faces+names, and sometimes, I get up to 100 students. 

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#5
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Posts298Likes159Joined6/10/2018LocationLagos / NG
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Spaced repetition is a proven memory technique that helps you keep what you've learned strong in your mind. The way it works is you review each word or phrase you've learned in spaced intervals. Initially the intervals will be smaller: you might review a new word a few times in one practice session, and then again the next day. Once you know it well you'll be able to leave days or weeks between revisiting without forgetting it.

I like using Duolingo and memrise for vocabulary and phrase practice because it takes care of spaced repetition for me. The app keeps track of which words I haven't practiced for a while and reminds me to strengthen my understanding of those. During each lesson, it mixes up familiar and new words to space out the repetition.

Kevwe A.

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Came to this thread from other thread :D


I like this approach, looks really interesting! 

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#7
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SRS has a lot of benefits especially for gaining large quantities of nouns and the advantages have been proven , however there were lots of tests and without constant renewal, or applying the new words learnt the information is simply not retained for long periods. 


For exaple if you were asked as a child the day after xmas .... to tell someone all the things you got and everything thta happened you would probably list the lot but after a few years of not retrieving the info you probably as an adult can only list what was memorable. Also because they are just translation based and solely visual ( even if you speak the words or hear them said aloud) many people can say a word but can't remember what it is for so it is hit and miss.... 


my advice is to start creating phrases with the new vocab as soon as possible. Writing the words out helps commit them to memory we are programmed to forget most of what we see. Our eyes have to filter out every grain of inute detail as we walk to work each day etc because if we stored it all we would run out of space at a very early age.. If we don't constantly retrieve the memory of something important we saw on that daily journey ( ie placemarkers that help us remember the route to go) then we lose the visual info very quickly. If you learn by looking at flashcards etc without stimulating other senses you will not store the visual info in the part of your brain that keeps permennt records

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