Is English in the USA more straight to the point?

Ranger
Posts228Likes 119Joined 16/9/2018Location
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Spanish
Other English, Italian

I have noticed that at least here in the US they use so many abreviations like asap, DM, IG, DH and more. Even when I studied accounting in English and Spanish I did notice that in English everything was more simplified. Is it that the people in here is more efficient and cut right to the chase. Like when you read a communication in Spanish is usually more adorned but in English is right to the topic. Is it something cultural. What are your thoughts?

-Ari-

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#1
Ent
Posts742Likes 460Joined 18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
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English
Learning Korean
Other Chinese - Mandarin, French, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

I think English in general, not just in the US, is pretty direct compared to the other languages I've studied. I think Taglish deserves the title of most abbreviations in my list of languages.

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#2
Elf
Posts125Likes 95Joined 3/9/2018LocationSkopje / MK
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Macedonian
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I think it might also be a reflection of the dynamic in a society, the general tempo of affairs. I didn't recognize the last three for example from the ones you mentioned, but it might also be concerned with that, like going straight to the point yes, not to waste time. But it's just a perception, and a certain collective desire for organising stuff. Southern cultures are more relaxed, so maybe that also relates to the reason why there are so many abbreviations in the English language or in the US. And English is almost a global language, so depending on the topic, it needs to contain abbreviations to deliver a message. That's my opinion. 


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#3
Ranger
Posts228Likes 119Joined 16/9/2018Location
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Spanish
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Yes, everything everything goes faster in here, always in a rush. DM direct message, IG Instagram, DH dear husband lol

-Ari-

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#4
Elf
Posts125Likes 95Joined 3/9/2018LocationSkopje / MK
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Hahaha hilarious 


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#5
Hobbit
Posts29Likes 23Joined 4/9/2018LocationChicago, Illinois / US
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English
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I'm so curious about other abbreviation cultures! While living in Indonesia I was surprised by how much Indonesians love to combine longer words into shorter versions. Like one example is the term baper, short for bawah (bring) perasaan (feelings) and used to describe someone who's being dramatic. There are so many of these condensed phrases but I don't know if the reason is primarily efficiency.

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#6
Dwarf
Posts70Likes 20Joined 3/9/2018LocationBuenos Aires / AR
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English, Spanish

yes, in English everything is more abbreviated, they use a lot of acronyms, it saves time and once you learn them ,you use them automatically.

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#7
Ranger
Posts410Likes 211Joined 4/9/2018LocationCaracas / VE
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Spanish
Learning German, Italian
Other English

I tried to write down a coherent sentence only using abbreviations: PPL IMO YOLO.


I think you are right, English is more direct. The abbreviation that comes to my mind in Spanish is not even an acronym like the ones we can read in English and it is vulgar >.<...

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#8
Hobbit
Posts19Likes 12Joined 5/9/2018LocationLisbon / PT
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Portuguese
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It depends the situation. If it is written and informal it's very useful. If formal, no sense in using it. When talking, it's very useful like ASAP.

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#9
Ranger
Posts347Likes 188Joined 13/7/2018LocationPasig / PH
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Tagalog
Learning English, French, Spanish

I think the increased use of acronyms is how this generation's use of slang has manifested. We use slang words for informal settings and ease of use, and the current generation grew up on and is now defining the communication medium of text messaging. It would make sense to see text shortcuts bleed into everyday speech. For example, my wife and our immediate families grew up on chatrooms and messengers so, every now and then, one of us would say "LOL" out loud.  


But since the acronyms are basically slang, I doubt that they'd be present in any formal communication.

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#10
Hobbit
Posts29Likes 23Joined 4/9/2018LocationChicago, Illinois / US
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Phillip.Laplana wrote:
I think the increased use of acronyms is how this generation's use of slang has manifested. We use slang words for informal settings and ease of use, and the current generation grew up on and is now defining the communication medium of text messaging. It would make sense to see text shortcuts bleed into everyday speech. For example, my wife and our immediate families grew up on chatrooms and messengers so, every now and then, one of us would say "LOL" out loud.
But since the acronyms are basically slang, I doubt that they'd be present in any formal communication.


I remember my own transition from using chat abbreviations like LOL ironically to using them in earnest as a useful shorthand. SO many things that I started saying as a joke have bled into my daily speech, too - IMHO, Bee Tee Dubs (for BTW), JK ...

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#11
Ranger
Posts347Likes 188Joined 13/7/2018LocationPasig / PH
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Tagalog
Learning English, French, Spanish

SarahSchaffer wrote:
Phillip.Laplana wrote:
I think the increased use of acronyms is how this generation's use of slang has manifested. We use slang words for informal settings and ease of use, and the current generation grew up on and is now defining the communication medium of text messaging. It would make sense to see text shortcuts bleed into everyday speech. For example, my wife and our immediate families grew up on chatrooms and messengers so, every now and then, one of us would say "LOL" out loud.
But since the acronyms are basically slang, I doubt that they'd be present in any formal communication.

I remember my own transition from using chat abbreviations like LOL ironically to using them in earnest as a useful shorthand. SO many things that I started saying as a joke have bled into my daily speech, too - IMHO, Bee Tee Dubs (for BTW), JK ...
That *is* ironic! ^_^ On my side of the pond, we are less beeteedubs and IMHO. Coolness.

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#12
Elf
Posts105Likes 21Joined 5/9/2018Locationlahore / PK

Life is too fast, bulk of tasks and shortage of time. Precision, less labor and higher efficiency are perhaps the intentions to opt contractions.

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#13
Elf
Posts147Likes 64Joined 5/6/2018LocationLapu-lapu / PH
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Cebuano, Tagalog
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I think so. And they pronounce their words very clear.

Charlyn Amoin

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#14
Hobbit
Posts24Likes 7Joined 5/9/2018Locationmaryland / US
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Urdu
Learning Arabic - Gulf

it depends if you are texting than its more abbreviated , if you are talking than its not.

Mariam Irshad

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#15
Dwarf
Posts70Likes 20Joined 3/9/2018LocationBuenos Aires / AR
Native
English, Spanish

most of my students prefer American English

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#16
Elf
Posts105Likes 21Joined 5/9/2018Locationlahore / PK

yes very right GonzaloA

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#17
Elf
Posts149Likes 64Joined 15/9/2018LocationSkopje / MK
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Macedonian
Other English, Serbian

I think the evolution of the world made the american english be more direct.


Everything is fast paced and no one has time for BS, so that's why the Americans seem to use more direct approach....according to me of course :D 

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#18
Dwarf
Posts50Likes 43Joined 3/9/2018LocationManila / PH
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American English, as I tell my students, is direct. Direct in a way that it's conversational English. Grammar is not really follow, as long as you can convey your thoughts, then it's direct.

Aleks

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#19
Hobbit
Posts24Likes 7Joined 5/9/2018Locationmaryland / US
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Urdu
Learning Arabic - Gulf

Yes less complex than. British English 

Mariam Irshad

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#20