Do you know of any languages that you speak which are dying out?

Hobbit
Posts47Likes 18Joined 3/9/2018Location

I have heard the with the advent of technology and translators there are very few takers to learn new languages. Just wanted to know if you know of any languages that are victims of this.

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#1
Ent
Posts742Likes 460Joined 18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
Native
English
Learning Korean
Other Chinese - Mandarin, French, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Good question. My languages are all big (over 50m speakers), so they aren't really threatened by technology. I wonder what others think about this topic - does technology hurt or help dying languages? I can see a case being made for both lines of thought.

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Hobbit
Posts21Likes 28Joined 4/7/2018LocationPhiladelphia / US
Native
English
Other Esperanto, Japanese, Spanish

I speak Esperanto. It's a different situation, but technology has only helped it to start growing again. I hope that in a few years, we will be able to say that Duolingo has helped languages like Hawaiian and Navajo.

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Ranger
Posts410Likes 211Joined 4/9/2018LocationCaracas / VE
Native
Spanish
Learning German, Italian
Other English

All the languages I know and my target languages are not in danger. I think that technology is not part of the problem, people are the problem. I think that the dialects or languages are dying is because we don't know them or we do not care. I really doubt that the official language of each country would get in danger because of this, with globalization technology should help us to share and learn languages, not the opposite.


In my country there are at least 70 indigenous languages and I do not speak any of them and I do not know anyone that does. Some of them have gone extinct like the Tamanaco, Cumanagoto, Otomaco, Guamontey and Chaima language. Others had more luck, like the Mapoyo language that got into the "List of Intangible Cultural Heritage that requires urgent safeguard measures" (Lista del Patrimonio Cultural Inmaterial que requiere medidas urgentes de salvaguarda) of the UNESCO on 2014, or the language Añú that went through a process of revitalization supported by UNICEF. 

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#4