Have you heard about Gibberish?

Elf
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Hi dear fellow language students,


Have you ever heard about Gibberish? If not, I will give you a brief explanation of what it is. It is an invented language where people talk nonsense, no meaning whatsoever, no legitimate words, just pure nonsense. What is interesting about gibberish, is that it does however cross a certain message, because one of the ways to use it, is to know in your head what you are saying and the intention, but say it in a totally ridiculous unfamiliar way. Many actors use the technique of gibberish to learn and exercise the accent of a certain language. You can talk Italian gibberish, Spanish gibberish, Hebrew gibberish, Russian gibberish, and it’s a good start to getting used to and learning the language. Why? Because by listening and focusing only on the accent and form of the language, as well as many other details you’d be interested in, not only that you take in and understand the dominant sounds or/and exceptions in vowels, consonants or symbols in comparison to your most known languages for example, but you also get a relatively broader image of how the language sounds, what it emits, and many times, what is the dominant attitude of the people speaking that language themselves. Sometimes friends create their own gibberish language like a secret language that no one else understands. But I am mostly mentioning it here as a technique often actors use themselves, to just grasp the attitude of the people themselves, and fortunately, it’s a very good beginning to diving deeper into the language. Just play around, is the main goal of this exercise. However, the brain reacts to it very well, since it doesn’t strain to achieve any correct answer, but just focuses on producing the sound of it. If you include the specific body movements/language too, even better. It does get us out of our comfort zones very often. 


So, have you ever tried practicing your new language in a totally ridiculous way like this one? Would you try this? Have you ever? With what language would you start? 



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#1
Ent
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I've never heard of this technique used in language learning, but it sounds interesting. Can you find a video on youtube that demonstrates this the way you describe?

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Elf
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Hey Leo, yes! I would love to.


In this first video, you can see a theater group having a play called Improv (short for improvisation) and this exercise is called Synchronization. What they do is ask the audience for a language they would like the guys to play in/with, then the director (guy with the mic) asks for a profession/occupation/job individuals from the audience wouldn't like to exist in this world. Just imaginative, fun exercise. Then while 2 of the guys improvise with the drama, other 2 of the group of actors consecutively interpret what they are saying based on their body language and tone of speech. These guys are graduated/certified actors, so they have loads of exercises and familiarity with languages and their sounds beforehand. They pick the Greek language in this one.

The group is from Macedonia, basic language is Macedonian, but you don't need to know it to hear how they mimic Greek and go around with the play. 

I hope you enjoy :) 



  


The second link is a very well know girl who got super famous after this exact video, where she speaks gibberish in many languages, but nails all of the accents perfectly, that it doesn't even leave an impression she has no idea what she's talking about. She is originally from Finland, super talented and had her channel growing virally from that moment on. I am pretty sure many of you are familiar with her/this video, however for those not familiar with it, there you go, enjoy. I still highly admire 



 


I hope this was enough! If not, feel free to add more comments and ask. And I would also like to know your opinion and impression on both videos/guys


Wishing you a good day and thanks again for asking, 


(edited to use the youtube option in the tool bar above)


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#3
Ent
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The second one reminds me of this old favorite:



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#4
Ranger
Posts204Likes 112Joined 6/10/2018LocationLagos / NG
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I didn't see this before and I must say it's really fascinating. What we did back in school was,take English words and just add some random words in front of it so it sounds very African. For example, "What did you eat" would be "Whata digu yugu etenge". It was so much fun back then.

Kevwe A.

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#5
Dwarf
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And that`s fascinating to see how people perceive your native language (in my case - Russian). But I don`t really imagine how to apply this into language learning. Does it make sense to train pronunciation without using real words of that language?


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#6
Elf
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Vladyslava wrote:

And that`s fascinating to see how people perceive your native language (in my case - Russian). But I don`t really imagine how to apply this into language learning. Does it make sense to train pronunciation without using real words of that language?


It does, for the accent. Maybe for the common or stereotyped attitude of the people too. But mostly for the accent. As I said, rather at the beginning. It's not part of usual language learning techniques, but can be used for acting and acquiring the accent. 


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#7
Elf
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Oghenekevwe wrote:

I didn't see this before and I must say it's really fascinating. What we did back in school was,take English words and just add some random words in front of it so it sounds very African. For example, "What did you eat" would be "Whata digu yugu etenge". It was so much fun back then.


Wow, amazing! :))


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#8
Ranger
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leosmith wrote:

The second one reminds me of this old favorite:



This is exactly how the songs in the radio in English sound to me

-Ari-

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#9
Ranger
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I literally have to turn on the close captions while watching tv. It is a great way to understand and learn at the same time.

-Ari-

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#10
Ent
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Vladyslava wrote:
Does it make sense to train pronunciation without using real words of that language?
Not to me it doesn't. I intentionally study pronunciation when I learn languages, and I would find it inefficient, if not downright damaging not to use correct language.

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#11
Elf
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leosmith wrote:

Vladyslava wrote:
Does it make sense to train pronunciation without using real words of that language?
Not to me it doesn't. I intentionally study pronunciation when I learn languages, and I would find it inefficient, if not downright damaging not to use correct language.

 


I agree with this too. 


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#12