British vs American English

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Posts220Likes117Joined9/7/2018LocationUS
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Here's a video on some differences between British vs. American English...




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#1
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Posts363Likes174Joined10/7/2018LocationBinan City / PH
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This is very informative. Thanks for sharing!... Though I wonder why it is called 1st floor in British instead of 2nd floor. Do you have any idea? 

Edzky-18

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#2
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Posts409Likes152Joined10/7/2018LocationTrece Martires City / PH
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It should be first floor right? ground floor, then 1st floor. Am I correct?Can someone please enlightened me. lol

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Posts840Likes507Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
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Imo, sometimes the ground floor isn't the first floor, depending on the building. For example, I often stay in a condo in Thailand. The first 2 floors are for parking, and they are above ground; there are no basement or underground floors. So the inside of the building really starts on the 3rd floor, and they call that the ground floor (there is a G beside the 3 button in the elevator). Confusing.  

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Posts21Likes29Joined4/7/2018LocationPhiladelphia / US
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Michelle.Batan wrote:
It should be first floor right? ground floor, then 1st floor. Am I correct?Can someone please enlightened me. lol


This varies regionally. Where I live, the ground floor and the first floor are the same thing, but in other places, it is as you say :)

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#5
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Posts347Likes191Joined13/7/2018LocationPasig / PH
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Where I'm from, there's a curious mix of British and American terms in infrastructure. Our buildings have a Ground Floor and the first level up is the second floor. But the building plans will indicate water closets instead of toilets or rest rooms. Major roads are called highways or expressways, not motorways, but the means to access them are called flyovers instead of on-ramps or off-ramps. We use elevators, not lifts. We have both car parks *and* parking lots. We almost habitually ignore pedestrian crossings, and never refer to them as crosswalks. We go to movie theaters to watch movies but the theaters are labelled Cinema 1, Cinema 2, and so on. I imagine it can be such a challenge. :)

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Posts220Likes117Joined9/7/2018LocationUS
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Phillip.Laplana wrote:
Where I'm from, there's a curious mix of British and American terms in infrastructure. Our buildings have a Ground Floor and the first level up is the second floor. But the building plans will indicate water closets instead of toilets or rest rooms. Major roads are called highways or expressways, not motorways, but the means to access them are called flyovers instead of on-ramps or off-ramps. We use elevators, not lifts. We have both car parks *and* parking lots. We almost habitually ignore pedestrian crossings, and never refer to them as crosswalks. We go to movie theaters to watch movies but the theaters are labelled Cinema 1, Cinema 2, and so on. I imagine it can be such a challenge. :)
Interesting! Thanks for posting this! I would love to visit there sometime soon. My best friend is from the Philippines. :)


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Posts347Likes191Joined13/7/2018LocationPasig / PH
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Khadijah.Davis wrote:
Phillip.Laplana wrote:
Where I'm from, there's a curious mix of British and American terms in infrastructure. Our buildings have a Ground Floor and the first level up is the second floor. But the building plans will indicate water closets instead of toilets or rest rooms. Major roads are called highways or expressways, not motorways, but the means to access them are called flyovers instead of on-ramps or off-ramps. We use elevators, not lifts. We have both car parks *and* parking lots. We almost habitually ignore pedestrian crossings, and never refer to them as crosswalks. We go to movie theaters to watch movies but the theaters are labelled Cinema 1, Cinema 2, and so on. I imagine it can be such a challenge. :)
Interesting! Thanks for posting this! I would love to visit there sometime soon. My best friend is from the Philippines. :)


We would be happy to have you here. ^__^

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