Do you try to pronounce borrowed words like native speakers of that language?

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Posts962Likes609Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
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I do, most of the time at least. How about you? For example, when you say "Los Angeles", what does the g sound like?

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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Posts73Likes80Joined8/7/2018Location
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A hell of a lot of English is borrowed words, I suppose I do give accents to some words, but mainly ones with an accented vowel.

Useless information, but LA is actually called "El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río de Porciúncula"

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Greg.Jones wrote:
A hell of a lot of English is borrowed words

True. I should have said that I'm talking about words that theoretically retain their original spelling and pronunciation. Many make no effort. 

And how about when you're talking in a foreign language and you encounter an English word? Or a foreign word from yet another languages?

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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Posts41Likes29Joined14/7/2018LocationAbu Dhabi / AE
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Some of the commonly known Filipino words borrowed from English words such as:

"Air-con" refers to cooling unit or AC (Air Conditioning) in English

"CR" for Comfort Room or Bathroom/Toilet

"blow-out" means abundant supply of food and drinks like throwing a party for family and friends.

"black-out" to mean no power or if there's total power outages.


We use these words as it is with same pronunciation and meaning but at times in a different or nearly same context.


I must say that it is dependent on how it is being used and interpreted; however, it can be generally accepted from one country to another.



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leosmith wrote:

how about when you're talking in a foreign language and you encounter an English word? Or a foreign word from yet another languages?


I think most of them stick out if they aren't pronounced properly, I had a friend talking about a "coop" they had been learning about which confused me until I found out they were talking about a coup d'etat.

I haven't really heard English words in foreign languages unless they're brand names, which sound out of place to me

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janahfacal.. wrote:
We use these words as it is with same pronunciation and meaning but at times in a different or nearly same context.

Yes, but I'm asking about pronunciation, not usage. For example, do you personally use Tagalog pronunciation to pronounce those words, or do you try to use English pronunciation?

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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Posts385Likes192Joined11/7/2018LocationManila / PH
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If we're speaking in Tagalog then used an English word (borrowed or not), it'll most likely be pronounced with a Tagalog sound.


For example: "Gusto ko ng chocolate." (I want some chocolate.) Almost nobody would pronounce chocolate as chä-k-lət. We would pronounce it as cho-ko-leyt.


Same thing goes for names. If we're speaking in English, we'll use English sounds like schwas. If we're speaking in Tagalog, we'll stick to Tagalog vowels.


Ako po si Jessica. (je-see-kah)

I'm Jessica. (je-si-kuh)


The only time people say it with English sounds is if (1) The sentence is mostly in English. (2) They speak in a "conio" way.


For example: "I think gusto niya ng chocolate." (I think he/she wants some chocolate). In this sentence, it's probable that chocolate would be pronounced with the schwa.


As for conio speak, they even say Tagalog words with English sounds so, yeah. They'll most likely say it the "right" way. 

--

ikay

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Posts56Likes45Joined9/7/2018LocationDE
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Yes i try to pronounce them as in their native language. I dont know why exactly. I just feels right :)


harmony. 

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Posts347Likes191Joined13/7/2018LocationPasig / PH
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Yes it does feel right. I think that has something to do with natural lingual mimicry when you like a language. For example, when I worked for a British account for some years I began to pronounce certain words differently, though I maintained a mostly American accent.

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Phillip.Laplana wrote:

when I worked for a British account for some years I began to pronounce certain words differently


I think you mean 'correctly' XD

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Greg.Jones wrote:
Phillip.Laplana wrote:
when I worked for a British account for some years I began to pronounce certain words differently

I think you mean 'correctly' XD


Hah! Good form. :D

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Phillip.Laplana wrote:

Yes it does feel right. I think that has something to do with natural lingual mimicry when you like a language.


This is a very common reason, especially among college or university students studying abroad, they tend to adopt the local accent as they talk within their peer groups. This also affects some people to such a degree subconsciously they start to use another persons speech pattern in normal conversations, it's usually called phonetic accommodation, but there are several names for it.

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