Korean Language Learners

level
9
Posts385Likes192Joined11/7/2018LocationManila / PH
Native
Tagalog
Learning English, Korean

I thought I'd create a thread for everyone who's currently learning Korean. We don't have a member who's a native speaker but maybe we can help each other learn. :) Learning is more fun when it's done with other people. We can also share resources or even just encourage each other to learn something new everyday.


To start, let's get to know each other better. :)


Me as a learner: I'm at A1- Beginner. I can read and write in Hangul. I know about 30 words. A gist of how grammar and sentence construction works.


Me as a source of learning: I'm a Learning Consultant so I have tons of resource materials on just about anything. That and I love helping people learn.



Note: I created this thread because it's hard to catch people on chat. This way, we can post practice sheets, video links, tips, and whatnot and they're all in one place. :)

--

ikay

Posted 
1
#1
level
27
Posts838Likes505Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin, French, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

I'm B2 in Korean, but a bit rusty. I plan on picking it back up again right after reaching a strong B2 in Tagalog, which I predict will be in 2 or 3 more months.

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posted 
1
#2
level
5
Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
Native
English, Tagalog
Learning Japanese, Korean
Other Arabic - Standard

Charlyn wrote:

Hi Rai! Korean and Japanese languages are both interesting to learn. :slightly_smiling_face: What specifically learning guides you mean, for Korean and Japanese?


Hi Charlyn. Watching K-dramas piqued my interest. So then, I started learning the Korean alphabet. I also tried to read Korean texts to practice the vowels. Now, I don't know where do I go next. :) Enlighten me, please.

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1
#3
level
27
Posts838Likes505Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin, French, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Rai.S. wrote:
Watching K-dramas piqued my interest. So then, I started learning the Korean alphabet. I also tried to read Korean texts to practice the vowels. Now, I don't know where do I go next. :) Enlighten me, please.

How is your pronunciation? I'd recommend getting a good handle on that before doing anything other than listening (or watching). You should be able to pronounce phonemes, words and sentences properly. Here is a nice tool for double consonants, which is the toughest part of Korean pronunciations for me. 

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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#4
level
8
Posts204Likes76Joined5/6/2018LocationLapu-lapu / PH
Native
Cebuano, Tagalog
Other English

Hi again Rai! Yes, i do understand. It's quite difficult to enhance our learning another language but I believe you can do it really soon. :) The admin, LeoSmith just give you the best tip. :) Goodluck! :)

Charlyn Amoin

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1
#5
level
5
Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
Native
English, Tagalog
Learning Japanese, Korean
Other Arabic - Standard

leosmith wrote:
Rai.S. wrote:
Watching K-dramas piqued my interest. So then, I started learning the Korean alphabet. I also tried to read Korean texts to practice the vowels. Now, I don't know where do I go next. :) Enlighten me, please.

How is your pronunciation? I'd recommend getting a good handle on that before doing anything other than listening (or watching). You should be able to pronounce phonemes, words and sentences properly. Here is a nice tool for double consonants, which is the toughest part of Korean pronunciations for me.

I think I've got no problem with the consonants. As for the vowels, I'm having a bit of a hard time mastering them. Sometimes, I read Korean names familiarize myself with the vowels. I also noticed that some consonants will have different pronunciations in certain cases. Thank you for the tip leosmith. I will definitely try this one out. Hope I'd make some progress soon. 

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1
#6
level
9
Posts385Likes192Joined11/7/2018LocationManila / PH
Native
Tagalog
Learning English, Korean

Rai.S. wrote:
leosmith wrote:
Rai.S. wrote:
Watching K-dramas piqued my interest. So then, I started learning the Korean alphabet. I also tried to read Korean texts to practice the vowels. Now, I don't know where do I go next. :) Enlighten me, please.

How is your pronunciation? I'd recommend getting a good handle on that before doing anything other than listening (or watching). You should be able to pronounce phonemes, words and sentences properly. Here is a nice tool for double consonants, which is the toughest part of Korean pronunciations for me.

I think I've got no problem with the consonants. As for the vowels, I'm having a bit of a hard time mastering them. Sometimes, I read Korean names familiarize myself with the vowels. I also noticed that some consonants will have different pronunciations in certain cases. Thank you for the tip leosmith. I will definitely try this one out. Hope I'd make some progress soon.


After learning the alphabet, I started building my vocab and started on basic grammar. Pronunciation will come with practice so just continue reading out loud so your mouth muscles can get used to producing the sounds.


Pro tip: Stay away from 'romanji" or Romanized Korean. That's gonna mess up your pronunciation.

--

ikay

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2
#7
level
27
Posts838Likes505Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin, French, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

ikaymoreno wrote:
Pronunciation will come with practice so just continue reading out loud so your mouth muscles can get used to producing the sounds. Pro tip: Stay away from 'romanji" or Romanized Korean. That's gonna mess up your pronunciation.

I completely agree that nobody masters pronunciation without doing a lot of practicing, and reading out loud is a great way to practice. But before you start reading out loud, you should have a good grasp on basic pronunciation. For example, you should be at least comprehensible to a native speaker. The consonant and vowel sounds you make should be distinguishable from one another, etc. Otherwise, when you start reading, even if it's silent, you will be repeating and practicing incorrect pronunciation, and these errors will fossilize and be hard to fix with time.


I also completely agree that one should avoid romanized Korean. Romanized Korean is called romaja. Romanized Japanese is called romaji. There is no romanji, although I admit that I used to think it was called that too.

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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3
#8
level
5
Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
Native
English, Tagalog
Learning Japanese, Korean
Other Arabic - Standard

ikaymoreno wrote:
Rai.S. wrote:
leosmith wrote:
Rai.S. wrote:
Watching K-dramas piqued my interest. So then, I started learning the Korean alphabet. I also tried to read Korean texts to practice the vowels. Now, I don't know where do I go next. :) Enlighten me, please.

How is your pronunciation? I'd recommend getting a good handle on that before doing anything other than listening (or watching). You should be able to pronounce phonemes, words and sentences properly. Here is a nice tool for double consonants, which is the toughest part of Korean pronunciations for me.

I think I've got no problem with the consonants. As for the vowels, I'm having a bit of a hard time mastering them. Sometimes, I read Korean names familiarize myself with the vowels. I also noticed that some consonants will have different pronunciations in certain cases. Thank you for the tip leosmith. I will definitely try this one out. Hope I'd make some progress soon.

After learning the alphabet, I started building my vocab and started on basic grammar. Pronunciation will come with practice so just continue reading out loud so your mouth muscles can get used to producing the sounds.
Pro tip: Stay away from 'romanji" or Romanized Korean. That's gonna mess up your pronunciation.


Hello ikaymoreno. Thank you for the tip. Do you have any links on Korean grammar? I often see Romanized Korean in K-pop song translations, but I have no idea how to distinguish between this and the "correct" grammar. Any insights? Thank you so much.

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1
#9
level
5
Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
Native
English, Tagalog
Learning Japanese, Korean
Other Arabic - Standard

leosmith wrote:
ikaymoreno wrote:
Pronunciation will come with practice so just continue reading out loud so your mouth muscles can get used to producing the sounds. Pro tip: Stay away from 'romanji" or Romanized Korean. That's gonna mess up your pronunciation.

I completely agree that nobody masters pronunciation without doing a lot of practicing, and reading out loud is a great way to practice. But before you start reading out loud, you should have a good grasp on basic pronunciation. For example, you should be at least comprehensible to a native speaker. The consonant and vowel sounds you make should be distinguishable from one another, etc. Otherwise, when you start reading, even if it's silent, you will be repeating and practicing incorrect pronunciation, and these errors will fossilize and be hard to fix with time.
I also completely agree that one should avoid romanized Korean. Romanized Korean is called romaja. Romanized Japanese is called romaji. There is no romanji, although I admit that I used to think it was called that too.


Thank you leosmith. I have opened the link, which you just posted here. It's really great!

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1
#10
level
1
Posts125Likes95Joined3/9/2018LocationSkopje / MK
Native
Macedonian
Other Arabic - Gulf, English, French, Spanish, Serbian

Leo said: "Otherwise, when you start reading, even if it's silent, you will be repeating and practicing incorrect pronunciation, and these errors will fossilize and be hard to fix with time."


I agree with this so much! I have experienced fossilizing of wrong pronunciation and it is so hard to eradicate after. We all have I assume. So I totally adhere to the practice of taking and learning it slowly but correctly, than moving swiftly but rather incorrectly. 


I would learn Indonesian next. 


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1
#11
level
27
Posts838Likes505Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin, French, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Rai.S. wrote:
Do you have any links on Korean grammar?

I'm sure ikaymoreno will answer too, but I just wanted to share these:

Korean from Zero - A free online textbook that's a great way to start with grammar.

Talk to me in Korean (TTMIK) - The best all-around resource for studying Korean also has excellent free grammar lessons, audio and PDFs, that go far beyond Korean from Zero.

How to Study Korean is another great free site with free grammar lessons (text only). I've only used lesson 11, because it fills in a big hole the the 2 previous resources covered incompletely (Seconds, Minutes, Hours, Days, Weeks, Months, Years)

Click Korean gets many positive reviews. I checked it out a bit, and like it, but I didn't use it because my other resources were sufficient.


I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posted 
1
#12
level
9
Posts385Likes192Joined11/7/2018LocationManila / PH
Native
Tagalog
Learning English, Korean

I learned the alphabet by asking one of my Korean students to teach me. I used Duolingo as refresher when I went back to learning Korean. I also created a practice sheet. I've attached it here.  


As for grammar, "Talk to me in Korean" is an excellent resource. I checked out some ebooks but given the limited amount of time I have to learn everyday anyway (30 mins - 1 hour every day), I found that mobile apps and TTMIK was more than enough.

--

ikay

Posted 
1
#13
level
27
Posts838Likes505Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin, French, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

ikaymoreno wrote:
I also created a practice sheet. I've attached it here.

I recommend against using transliteration, as I mentioned before, especially at this early level. There are so many free tables with audio online, there is no need to learn hangul with romaja. An example would be the Korean From Zero resource I listed above.


Let me illustrate the problem. Let's say you want to learn to 어. The correct way to do this is to listen to the audio a few times and write it out a few times while trying to pronounce it yourself. It's ok to read descriptions like "it's sounds something like the "aw" in saw, but is often pronounced more like "oh"" if you get stuck. After you do enough reviewing and trying to recall it, it will stick.


The wrong way to do it is to use the romaja "eo". eo in English sounds nothing like 어, so it's a really bad idea to map pronunciation to it. Once you've mapped something incorrect like this, it's hard to swap it out to fix it. And things get much worse if you start reading and reinforcing the error. 


Maybe you didn't do this, so sorry if that's the case. I just wanted to give people a warning about using that spreadsheet.

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posted 
2
#14
level
5
Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
Native
English, Tagalog
Learning Japanese, Korean
Other Arabic - Standard

leosmith wrote:
Let me illustrate the problem. Let's say you want to learn to 어. The correct way to do this is to listen to the audio a few times and write it out a few times while trying to pronounce it yourself. It's ok to read descriptions like "it's sounds something like the "aw" in saw, but is often pronounced more like "oh"" if you get stuck. After you do enough reviewing and trying to recall it, it will stick.
Maybe you didn't do this, so sorry if that's the case. I just wanted to give people a warning about using that spreadsheet.


Wow, this tip really sounded useful. Got the point right away, leosmith. So, I've used romaja from the very start. This is probably the reason why I'm having a hard time with vowels. Now, I've realized through your tip that the best way to do it is by relating it to an English word that sounds the same. Thank you.

Posted 
1
#15
level
5
Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
Native
English, Tagalog
Learning Japanese, Korean
Other Arabic - Standard

ikaymoreno wrote:
I learned the alphabet by asking one of my Korean students to teach me. I used Duolingo as refresher when I went back to learning Korean. I also created a practice sheet. I've attached it here.
As for grammar, "Talk to me in Korean" is an excellent resource. I checked out some ebooks but given the limited amount of time I have to learn everyday anyway (30 mins - 1 hour every day), I found that mobile apps and TTMIK was more than enough.


Thank you, ikay. One of my friends use Dualingo to learn Spanish and I'm like, "I would also want to try that one out." I'm going to check out TTMIK soon.

Posted 
1
#16
level
27
Posts838Likes505Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin, French, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Rai.S. wrote:
the best way to do it is by relating it to an English word that sounds the same

I meant that you should only use that as a back-up. It's best to just listen to the sound and try to map it directly to the hangul. If that fails then you can use the english sound-alike trick.

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posted 
2
#17
level
9
Posts385Likes192Joined11/7/2018LocationManila / PH
Native
Tagalog
Learning English, Korean

Rai.S. wrote:
Now, I've realized through your tip that the best way to do it is by relating it to an English word that sounds the same. Thank you.


A lot of Korean vowels actually sound closer to Filipino vowels than English.


아 = a

에 = e

이 = i

우 = u

--

ikay

Posted 
2
#18
level
5
Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
Native
English, Tagalog
Learning Japanese, Korean
Other Arabic - Standard

leosmith wrote:

I meant that you should only use that as a back-up. It's best to just listen to the sound and try to map it directly to the hangul. If that fails then you can use the english sound-alike trick.


Thanks a lot leosmith. I'll get to that best option then.

Posted 
1
#19
level
5
Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
Native
English, Tagalog
Learning Japanese, Korean
Other Arabic - Standard

ikaymoreno wrote:

A lot of Korean vowels actually sound closer to Filipino vowels than English.

아 = a

에 = e

이 = i

우 = u


Exactly, ikay. I couldn't resist to associate these with the Filipino language sometimes. :)

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#20
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