You know you're fluent in another language when...

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Posts69Likes49Joined8/7/2018LocationIT
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Russian, Swedish
Other English, Finnish, Italian

Someone may say they are trilingual when in fact they perhaps speak one language as a native speaker, a second language fluently and the third at only a proficient level. 

What about you? 

When can you say that you are fluent in another language? 

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#1
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Posts15Likes8Joined9/7/2018LocationGeorge Town / GY

For me its when you could read, write, and speak it perfectly and also understand slang within the language 

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#2
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Posts69Likes49Joined8/7/2018LocationIT
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How do you define "perfectly"? Even native speakers make mistakes :) 

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#3
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Posts15Likes8Joined9/7/2018LocationGeorge Town / GY

Correct even native speakers make mistakes but for them they could recover from it faster then someone whom is now learning the language. So when i say perfectly, im basically referring to the dialect

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#4
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Posts76Likes67Joined9/7/2018Location
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Honestly I have only ever felt truly fluent in one language other than English and that was Irish. I think the moment I felt fluent was when I was speaking it regularly and then suddenly someone spoke to me in English and the response just came out of my mouth in Irish. It feels fluent to me when you don't have to translate first to your native language in your mind, you just comprehend. I don't know... it is a very difficult concept to describe! Ha

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#5
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Posts21Likes20Joined10/7/2018LocationSI

Hi all,


Yes, once you "Think in the language", talk to yourself in it and don't have to build sentences even for a moment - basically, you speak without hesitation on nearly any given topic - that's what I consider fluent :)


Unfortunately, brain is like muscle and languages are too, if you don't stretch it / use it - the fluency fades away... :)


Keep talking guys!

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#6
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Posts927Likes581Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
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Learning Chinese - Mandarin, French, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

I actually don't use the term "fluent" any more because it means so many different things to different people. Instead I use the CEFR scale. 

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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#7
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Posts69Likes49Joined8/7/2018LocationIT
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leosmith wrote:
I actually don't use the term "fluent" any more because it means so many different things to different people. Instead I use the CEFR scale.
What is CEFR scale? :)

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#8
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Posts15Likes8Joined9/7/2018LocationGeorge Town / GY

not sure if im correct but here goes. "to achieve"

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#9
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Posts76Likes67Joined9/7/2018Location
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I'm also interested in knowing more about the CEFR scale. Maybe an post which explains it simply for us newbies!

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#10
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Posts927Likes581Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
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Learning Chinese - Mandarin, French, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

CEFR = Common European Framework of Reference for Languages

Wikipedia summarizes the levels very well, but here's a quick reference:


A1 = lower basic

A2 = upper basic

B1 = lower intermediate

B2 = upper intermediate

C1 = lower advance

C2 = upper advanced


I think most people consider B2 and above to be fluent, but again, it depends on who you talk to.


I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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#11
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Posts69Likes49Joined8/7/2018LocationIT
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Ah, yes, I am familiar with this framework. I consider C1 and C2 to be fluent. B2 in my opinion is proficient. I had level B2 in Polish language but I couldn't call myself fluent. And now I am probably back to A1. I haven't used Polish for 6 years now...

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#12
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Posts76Likes67Joined9/7/2018Location
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leosmith wrote:
CEFR = Common European Framework of Reference for Languages
Wikipedia summarizes the levels very well, but here's a quick reference:
A1 = lower basic
A2 = upper basic
B1 = lower intermediate
B2 = upper intermediate
C1 = lower advance
C2 = upper advanced
I think most people consider B2 and above to be fluent, but again, it depends on who you talk to.


That's very informative, thanks! It's great that there is such a framework actually.

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#13
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Posts34Likes18Joined13/7/2018LocationCA
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interesting post, but didn't really get the CEFR chart.. how can we determine wether you're lower or upper basic and when do you get to lower intermediate...i think its hard to tell even if there is a chart. 

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#14
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Posts347Likes191Joined13/7/2018LocationPasig / PH
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sabrina.torres wrote:
interesting post, but didn't really get the CEFR chart.. how can we determine wether you're lower or upper basic and when do you get to lower intermediate...i think its hard to tell even if there is a chart.:dizzy_face:


They determine your level through assessments. I'm a certified Berlitz assessor so my job is to assess applicants' English skills level using CEFR. 

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#15
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Posts34Likes18Joined13/7/2018LocationCA
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Oh ok hehe thanks

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#16
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Posts29Likes18Joined13/7/2018Location

leosmith wrote:
CEFR = Common European Framework of Reference for Languages
Wikipedia summarizes the levels very well, but here's a quick reference:
A1 = lower basic
A2 = upper basic
B1 = lower intermediate
B2 = upper intermediate
C1 = lower advance
C2 = upper advanced
I think most people consider B2 and above to be fluent, but again, it depends on who you talk to.


Very Informative, Today I learnt there's something exists that measures language fluency.

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#17
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Posts347Likes191Joined13/7/2018LocationPasig / PH
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B2 is the minimum level to be considered reasonably fluent. You can say that you're fluent in *speaking* a language if the following apply:

  • You can give clear descriptions and express your views on most things without struggling to find words to use
  • You don't make a lot of grammar mistakes. The ones you do make don't cause misunderstanding, confusion or amusement.
  • You can talk a lot for minutes at a time.
  • You can follow a conversation, help people keep it going, or change direction to a related topic.
  • You don't just talk and talk. You have a point to make and the way you string your ideas together makes sense.
  • You can circumlocute (describe something when you don't know the word) or you can paraphrase to cover gaps in vocabulary.
  • You spot your own grammar mistakes and automatically correct them.
  • You can talk about anything easily, whether you're familiar with the topic or not, and you speak with a level of formality that is appropriate to the situation.
  • You might have foreign-sounding pronunciation but you know where all the correct word stresses go in a sentence.

Whew! That's a lot. But you don't have to get all of it right. If seven of the above points apply to you, then you are reasonably fluent! :)


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#18
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Posts41Likes28Joined3/9/2018LocationCebu City / PH
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thanks! I finally found what I'm looking for


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#19
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Posts41Likes28Joined3/9/2018LocationCebu City / PH
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Marlan.Chunu wrote:
For me its when you could read, write, and speak it perfectly and also understand slang within the language
  


My thoughts exactly. I thinks it's when you can get on a conversation and be able to communicate smoothly without grasping for words.


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#20
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