Native Tagalog/Filipino speaker question - which numbers do you use and when?

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Posts840Likes507Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
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Native speakers use numbers in 3 different languages - english, spanish and tagalog. Which one do you normally use for:

telling time (spanish?)

age (tagalog?)

date of month (tagalog?)

year (english?)

counting (tagalog?)

prices (spanish?)

fractions (english?)

 

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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#1
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Posts363Likes174Joined10/7/2018LocationBinan City / PH
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Tagalog
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Telling time ( Spanish)

 Ex. Alas kwatro na pala.


Age ( Tagalog)

Ex. Siya ay dalawang taong gulang pa lang ng maulila.


Date of month (English) ..in my case we usuallly use English for months like January, February and so on.

Ex. Noong January kami ikinasal ng asawa ko.


Year (English)

Ex. Taong 2015 ipinanganak ko ang aking panganay.


Counting (Tagalog and English) I put both because the frequency of the use of both in most households is almost the same, although in my case we usually use the English one.


Prices ( Spanish)

Ex. Ang isang kilo ng bigas ay kwarenta y nuebe na ngayon.


Fractions (Tagalog & English)When you're in supermarket you will usually hear the English one but when you go to a wet market, you will hear mostly tagalog like "kalahati", "isang kilo" etc.


I hope I was able to help you with this. :blush:


Edzky-18

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#2
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Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
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Very well explained, edz. Might as well explain when and how we use ika-(number) for dates or counting. For example, ika-1, ika-28. I myself is a bit confused when it's used in dates of the month or anniversaries. Thanks in advance.

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#3
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Posts840Likes507Joined18/3/2018LocationBellingham / US
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Rai.S. wrote:
Very well explained, edz. Might as well explain when and how we use ika-(number) for dates or counting. For example, ika-1, ika-28. I myself is a bit confused when it's used in dates of the month or anniversaries. Thanks in advance.

So when do you use ordinal numbers, if at all? I hear unang and huling pretty often, but ika- very rarely.

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

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#4
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Posts385Likes192Joined11/7/2018LocationManila / PH
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Learning English, Korean

leosmith wrote:
Rai.S. wrote:
Very well explained, edz. Might as well explain when and how we use ika-(number) for dates or counting. For example, ika-1, ika-28. I myself is a bit confused when it's used in dates of the month or anniversaries. Thanks in advance.

So when do you use ordinal numbers, if at all? I hear unang and huling pretty often, but ika- very rarely.


Ordinal numbers: We use una, pangalawa, pangatlo...


I live in the Southern part of Luzon and you hear "ika-" here a lot. So people would say "ikalawa" instead of "pangalawa"

--

ikay

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#5
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Posts409Likes152Joined10/7/2018LocationTrece Martires City / PH
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Tagalog
Other English

time (spanish)

age (tagalog but most of the time english)

date of month (english)

year (englis?)

counting (tagalog, sometimes spanish)

prices (english)

fractions (english) :blush::blush::blush:

do the right thing even when nobody is watching

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#6
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Posts385Likes192Joined11/7/2018LocationManila / PH
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Michelle.Batan wrote:
time (spanish)
age (tagalog but most of the time english)
date of month (english)
year (englis?)
counting (tagalog, sometimes spanish)
prices (english)
fractions (english) :blush::blush::blush:


I think the only time I've ever heard date/year said in Tagalog was in Sibika (Civics).

--

ikay

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#7
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Posts409Likes152Joined10/7/2018LocationTrece Martires City / PH
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ikaymoreno wrote:
Michelle.Batan wrote:
time (spanish)
age (tagalog but most of the time english)
date of month (english)
year (englis?)
counting (tagalog, sometimes spanish)
prices (english)
fractions (english) :blush::blush::blush:

I think the only time I've ever heard date/year said in Tagalog was in Sibika (Civics).



Yeah, and in History too. 

do the right thing even when nobody is watching

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#8
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Posts112Likes33Joined15/10/2018LocationLingayen, Pangasinan / PH
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Learning Japanese, Korean
Other Arabic - Standard

leosmith wrote:

Rai.S. wrote:

Very well explained, edz. Might as well explain when and how we use ika-(number) for dates or counting. For example, ika-1, ika-28. I myself is a bit confused when it's used in dates of the month or anniversaries. Thanks in advance.

So when do you use ordinal numbers, if at all? I hear unang and huling pretty often, but ika- very rarely.


It's rarely used here in the North, but I often hear it in the news as follows: (You would notice that the first three numbers do not use "ika")


Una

Ikalawa

Ikatlo

Ika-apat and so on...


You'll often hear a newscaster saying:

"Kahapon ay ipinagdiwang nila ang ika-dalawampu't isang anibersaryo ng mag-asawa."


Hope this helps.

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#9
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Posts363Likes174Joined10/7/2018LocationBinan City / PH
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Other English

Rai.S. wrote:

leosmith wrote:

Rai.S. wrote:

Very well explained, edz. Might as well explain when and how we use ika-(number) for dates or counting. For example, ika-1, ika-28. I myself is a bit confused when it's used in dates of the month or anniversaries. Thanks in advance.

So when do you use ordinal numbers, if at all? I hear unang and huling pretty often, but ika- very rarely.

It's rarely used here in the North, but I often hear it in the news as follows: (You would notice that the first three numbers do not use "ika")

Una

Ikalawa

Ikatlo

Ika-apat and so on...

You'll often hear a newscaster saying:

"Kahapon ay ipinagdiwang nila ang ika-dalawampu't isang anibersaryo ng mag-asawa."

Hope this helps.


These sample sentences might help in distinguishing the use of "ika" and "pang":


1. Si Alex ay pangalawa/ikalawa sa limang magkakapatid. (Trans: "Alex is the 2nd in five siblings." Here you could either use "pangalawa" or "ikalawa")


2. Pinagdiwang ni Rose ang kaarawan nya noong ikalawa (ika-2) ng Febrero. (Trans: "Rose celebrated her birthday on the 2nd of February." In this case you could not use the word "pangalawa" because it is technically incorrect.


Other tandems are here...

Ikalawa = pangalawa

Ikatlo = pangatlo

Ikaapat = pang-apat

Ikalima = panglima

Ikaanim = pang-anim

Ikapito = pangpito

Ikawalo = pangwalo

Ikasiyam = pangsiyam

Ikasampu = pangsampu

Edzky-18

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