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Tagalog Grammar Lite Lesson 13 Using Enclitics

Before attempting this lesson, please read Appendix H.
Vocabulary
na
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already
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pa
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yet, still
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nga
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please particle
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din/rin
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also
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naman
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please particle
Show
daw/raw
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it is said
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po
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sir/madam
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ho
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sir/madam
Show
ba
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question particle
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Note – you are already familiar with some of these particles; I listed them all together here so that you could memorize the order that they appear.
Grammar
As you know from Appendix H, the enclitic cluster follows the enclitic magnate of the clause it belongs to. In this lesson we’ll practice using enclitics after discussing two points.
Sino ang verb
We have seen sino questions like this
Ex: Sino ang guro?
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= Who is the teacher?
Show
The word order is <sino, ang, noun>. Fortunately, this also works for verbs.
Ex: Sino ang nagbasa?
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= Who is the one that read?
Show
The word order is <sino, ang, verb>. Note that ang nagbasa means the one that read. Building on this,
Ex: Sino ang nagbasa ng libro?
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= Who is the one that read the book? = Who read the book?
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In the example, the term ang nagbasa ng libro is a noun clause so it can be used anywhere a noun can, like in this reply
Ans: Si Marco ang nagbasa ng libro.
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= Marco is the one who read the book.
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I’m going to call clauses like nagbasa ng libro a basic-clause, since it’s derived from a basic-sentence like
Ex: Nagbasa ng libro si Marco.
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= Marco read the book.
Show
Single vs multi-clause sentences
Let’s break some sentences into their clauses.
Ex: <Nagluto si Maria ng adobo.>
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= <basic-sentence> one clause
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Ex: <Sino> <ang nagluto ng adobo?>
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= <interrogative> <basic-clause> two clauses
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Ex: <Hindi> <nagluto si Maria ng adobo.>
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= <hindi + phrase> one clause
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Ex: <Hindi ba> <nagluto si Maria ng adobo?>
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= <hindi ba> <basic-clause> two clauses
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Usually the enclitic cluster goes after the first word in the clause, but not always. For example, it never goes after ang. It’s better to remember what the enclitic magnates are for each clause type. In basic-sentences and clauses, the verb is the enclitic magnate.
Ex A: Nagluto na siya ng adobo.
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= She already cooked adobo.
Show
In interrogative clauses, the interrogative is the enclitic magnate
Ex B: Sino raw ang nagluto rin ng adobo?
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= Who do they say also cooked the adobo?
Show
In hindi + phrase sentences, hindi is the enclitic magnate
Ex C: Hindi pa po siya nagluto ng adobo.
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= She hasn’t cooked adobo yet sir.
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But when hindi ba comes before a phrase, it acts like a tag-sentence and therefore is a separate clause, making the sentence two-clause. So when combined with a basic-phrase for example, hindi and the verb are both enclitic magnates
Ex D: Hindi ba nagluto rin siya ng adobo?
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= Didn’t she also cook the adobo?
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I’m using both slots in B and D above just to show you that it’s possible. You can switch the enclitic locations, or put them all in one slot and leave the other empty, and you will still have valid sentences, but the nuance might change.
Ex B1: Sino raw ang nagluto rin ng adobo?
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= <Who do they say> <also cooked the adobo?>
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Ex B2: Sino rin daw ang nagluto ng adobo?
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= <Who do they also say> <cooked the adobo?>
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The difference in these types of sino and hindi sentences is usually negligible, so in this book we will always put all enclitics right after sino or hindi to be consistent.
Note Summary
as a reminder, basic-sentence word order is <verb, enclitics, actor, object, IO, location, time>
sino ang verb word order is <sino, enclitics, ang, basic-clause>, and basic-clauses follow the rules of basic-sentences
hindi verb word order is <hindi, enclitics, basic-sentence>
Sample Sentences
Q1
You read(habitually) your book at 7 o’clock. (po)
Nagbabasa po kayo ng libro ninyo nang alas siyete.
Q2
Who do they say is also cleaning the house for Jose?
Sino rin daw ang naglilinis ng bahay para kay Jose?
Q3
Won’t we dine at 6 o’clock?
Hindi ba kami maghahapunan nang alas sais?
Q4
Stephen’s wife didn’t cook adobo yet for them.
Hindi pa nagluto ang asawa ni Stephen ng adobo para sa kanila.
Q5
She’s speaking already too.
Nagsasalita na rin siya.
Q6
Who also played tennis? (po)
Sino rin po ang nag-tennis?
Q7
You still aren’t having lunch at Jerry’s Grill?
Hindi ka pa ba nagtatanghalian sa Jerry’s Grill?
Q8
Read.(po)
Magbasa po kayo.
Q9
Did you already clean your car for her?
Naglinis ka na ba ng kotse mo para sa kaniya?
Q10
Who also will study Tagalog tomorrow? (po)
Sino rin po ang mag-aaral ng Tagalog bukas?

Edited

Corrections

Tagalog Grammar Lite Lesson 13 Using Enclitics
Before attempting this lesson, please read Appendix H [link] . Vocabulary na Show already Show pa Show yet, still Show nga Show please particle Show din/rin Show also Show naman Show please particle Show daw/raw Show it is said Show po Show sir/madam Show ho Show sir/madam Show ba Show question particle Show Note – you are already familiar with some of these particles; I listed them all together here so that you could memorize the order that they appear. Grammar As you know from Appendix H, the enclitic cluster follows the enclitic magnate of the clause it belongs to. In this lesson we’ll practice using enclitics after discussing two points. Sino ang verb We have seen sino questions like this Ex: Sino ang guro? Show = Who is the teacher? Show The word order is <sino, ang, noun>. Fortunately, this also works for verbs. Ex: Sino ang nagbasa? Show = Who is the one that read? Show The word order is <sino, ang, verb>. Note that ang nagbasa means the one that read. Building on this, Ex: Sino ang nagbasa ng libro? Show = Who is the one that read the book? = Who read the book? Show In the example, the term ang nagbasa ng libro is a noun clause so it can be used anywhere a noun can, like in this reply : Ans: Si Marco ang nagbasa ng libro. Show = Marco is the one who read the book. Show I’m going to call clauses like nagbasa ng libro a basic-clause, since it’s derived from a basic-sentence like : Ex: Nagbasa ng libro si Marco. Show = Marco read the book. Show Single vs multi-clause sentences Let’s break some sentences into their clauses. Ex: <Nagluto si Maria ng adobo.> Show = <basic-sentence> one clause Show Ex: <Sino> <ang nagluto ng adobo?> Show = <interrogative> <basic-clause> two clauses Show Ex: <Hindi> <nagluto si Maria ng adobo.> Show = <hindi + phrase> one clause Show Ex: <Hindi ba> <nagluto si Maria ng adobo?> Show = <hindi ba> <basic-clause> two clauses Show Usually the enclitic cluster goes after the first word in the clause, but not always. For example, it never goes after ang. It’s better to remember what the enclitic magnates are for each clause type. In basic-sentences and clauses, the verb is the enclitic magnate. Ex A: Nagluto na siya ng adobo. Show = She already cooked adobo. Show In interrogative clauses, the interrogative is the enclitic magnate Ex B: Sino raw ang nagluto rin ng adobo? Show = Who do they say also cooked the adobo? Show In hindi + phrase sentences, hindi is the enclitic magnate Ex C: Hindi pa po siya nagluto ng adobo. Show = She hasn’t cooked adobo yet sir. Show But when hindi ba comes before a phrase, it acts like a tag-sentence and therefore is a separate clause, making the sentence two-clause. So when combined with a basic-phrase for example, hindi and the verb are both enclitic magnates : Ex D: Hindi ba nagluto rin siya ng adobo? Show = Didn’t she also cook the adobo? Show I’m using both slots in B and D above just to show you that it’s possible. You can switch the enclitic locations, or put them all in one slot and leave the other empty, and you will still have valid sentences, but the nuance might change. Ex B1: Sino raw ang nagluto rin ng adobo? Show = <Who do they say> <also cooked the adobo?> Show Ex B2: Sino rin daw ang nagluto ng adobo? [Perhaps you could include a quick note to explain when to use "raw" or "daw". I quickly looked it up and read that "raw" is used after words ending with a vowel, /w/, or /y/, while "daw" is used in all other cases. I guessed it was probably something like that...] Show = <Who do they also say> <cooked the adobo?> Show The difference in these types of sino and hindi sentences is usually negligible, so in this book we will always put all enclitics right after sino or hindi to be consistent. Note Summary as a reminder, basic-sentence word order is <verb, enclitics, actor, object, IO, location, time> sino ang verb word order is <sino, enclitics, ang, basic-clause>, and basic-clauses follow the rules of basic-sentences hindi verb word order is <hindi, enclitics, basic-sentence> Sample Sentences Q1 You read (habitually) your book at 7 o’clock. (po) Nagbabasa po kayo ng libro ninyo nang alas siyete. Q2 Who do they say is also cleaning the house for Jose? Sino rin daw ang naglilinis ng bahay para kay Jose? Q3 Won’t we dine at 6 o’clock? Hindi ba kami maghahapunan nang alas sais? Q4 Stephen’s wife didn’t cook adobo yet for them. Hindi pa nagluto ang asawa ni Stephen ng adobo para sa kanila. Q5 She’s speaking already too. Nagsasalita na rin siya. Q6 Who also played tennis? (po) Sino rin po ang nag-tennis? Q7 You still aren’t having lunch at Jerry’s Grill? [personal note: I'm getting more and more curious about Jerry's Grill... ;)] Hindi ka pa ba nagtatanghalian sa Jerry’s Grill? Q8 Read. Please read! (po) Magbasa po kayo. Q9 Did you already clean your car for her? Naglinis ka na ba ng kotse mo para sa kaniya? Q10 Who also will study Tagalog tomorrow? (po) Sino rin po ang mag-aaral ng Tagalog bukas?
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Comment(s)

Rin/din, raw/daw explanation belongs in Appendix H; I thought it was there, so thanks for noting the omission. Jerry's Grill does very good business but isn't very highly regarded per my poll of pinoy friends. Jollibee's is more or less universally beloved however. I can eat at either of them, but avoid it if possible.
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