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Tagalog Grammar Lite Lesson 1 Pronunciation

Although this is meant to be a pure grammar course, I want learners to be able to start here if they so choose. I believe starting to learn a language without having a good base in pronunciation can lead to fossilized pronunciation errors in the future, so I decided to include this lesson.
How to do this lesson
Read through the whole thing. As you go along, click the Tagalog words, listen and repeat. Do one at a time until you feel that you are pronouncing it correctly, then move onto the next one.
After going through the whole lesson, go through again, this time without reading any descriptions. Only look at the Tagalog words; cover everything else (RH side can be hidden by selecting) if that helps. Pronounce a word, then click the audio. If your pronunciation was correct, go onto the next word. If not, keep doing it until you feel that you are pronouncing it correctly, then move onto the next one.
If you have time, keep repeating the previous step until you feel that you are pronouncing them all correctly the first time.
Repeat this lesson until it’s easy for you to get them all correct the first time through.
Stress
In a Tagalog word, usually at least one vowel is stressed. Stress is when a vowel is pronounced longer. In new vocabulary for this book, stress will be denoted by underlining. It isn’t denoted in native material. Using the correct stress is important because wrong stress sounds strange to native speakers, and it can cause the word to have a different meaning:
hapon
Show
(afternoon)
Show
hapon
Show
(Japan)
Show
Glottal Stop
When a vowel has a glottal stop, the sound ends abruptly, like in English after the uh in the word uh oh. There are two places where glottal stops occur. First, they may occur in the last letter of a word if the word ends in a vowel. Not all words ending in vowels have glottal stops, so in new vocabulary for this book, they will be denoted by an accent mark. These are not denoted in native material:
hindí
Show
(no)
Show
walá
Show
(nothing)
Show
Second, when there are two or more adjacent vowels in a word, all of them will have a glottal stop except the last one. These don’t need to be denoted, since they always occur:
oo
Show
(yes) sounds like ó + o
Show
taon
Show
(year) sounds like tá + on
Show
Alphabet
A alcohol
Show
aso (dog)
Show
B boy
Show
bukid (farm)
Show
D dog
Show
dito (here)
Show
E elephant
Show
eroplano (airplane)
Show
G game
Show
galing (skilled)
Show
H heart
Show
halos (almost)
Show
I it
Show
ibon (bird)
Show
K karate
Show
keso (cheese)
Show
L like
Show
lang (only)
Show
M mom
Show
mabuti (fine)
Show
N name
Show
na (already)
Show
O old
Show
oo (yes)
Show
P pin
Show
pero (but)
Show
R *
Show
rep (fridge)
Show
S so
Show
suká (vinegar)
Show
T tall
Show
tamá (correct)
Show
U destitute
Show
ulo (head)
Show
W way
Show
walá (nothing)
Show
Y yes
Show
yaya (nanny)
Show
* There is no English equivalent, but it’s the same as the Spanish single R. It sounds a bit like the dd in ladder if that helps.
Variations – when i comes at the end of a word, it can be pronounced more like a Tagalog e; k can sound a bit raspy at times
Loan letters C, F, J, Q, V, X, Z sometimes appear, and they are normally pronounced the same as their English counterparts.
Spanish loan letter Ñ sometimes appears in place of the Tagalog ny:
Ñ canyon
Show
niña (girl)
Show
Combination letters
DIY/DY jam
Show
diyan (there)
Show
NG sang
Show
ngayon (now)
Show
NIY/NY canyon
Show
niya (his/hers)
Show
SIY/SY shot
Show
siya (he/she)
Show
TS chill
Show
tsaka (furthermore)
Show
Variations – diy, niy and siy can also be pronounced as their individual letters, or somewhere in between. For example, diyan can be pronounced as jan, di-yan or jyan. The i can also be dropped from the spelling.
Spanish combination LL sometimes appears in place of the Tagalog ly:
LL all-year
Show
Villalobos (a Spanish surname)
Show
Names of letters
The names of letters A thru Z and combination letters are the same as English. Ñ is pronounced the same as Spanish (enye).
Special words
NG is a combination letter, but there is also a word spelled the same way.
ng
Show
is pronounced nang (and roughly means of)
Show
mga
Show
is another special word, pronounced manga (a grammatical word used to make plurals)
Show

Edited

Corrections

Tagalog Grammar Lite Lesson 1 Pronunciation
Although this is meant to be a pure grammar course, I want learners to be able to start here if they so choose. I believe starting to learn a language without having a good base in pronunciation can lead to fossilized pronunciation errors in the future, so I decided to include this lesson.
How to do this lesson
Read through the whole thing. As you go along, click the Tagalog words, listen and repeat. Do one at a time until you feel that you are pronouncing it correctly, then move onto the next one.
After going through the whole lesson, go through again, this time without reading any descriptions. Only look at the Tagalog words; cover everything else
if that helps ( RH words and sentences on the right-hand side can be hidden by selecting them ) if that helps . Pronounce a word, then click the audio. If your pronunciation was correct, go onto the next word. If not, keep doing it until you feel that you are pronouncing it correctly, then move onto the next one.
If you have time, keep repeating the previous step until you feel that you are pronouncing them all correctly the first time.
Repeat this lesson until it’s easy for you to get them all correct the first time through.
Stress
In a Tagalog word, usually at least one vowel is stressed. Stress is when a vowel is pronounced longer
[note: given that stress can be conveyed in so many different ways, depending on the language, maybe it's best to add that vowel length is generally the case in Tagalog - sorry, being new to Tagalog, I'm not sure how stress is conveyed fully yet?] . In new vocabulary for this book, stress will be denoted by underlining. It isn’t denoted in native material. Using the correct stress is important because wrong stress sounds strange to native speakers, and it can cause the word to have a different meaning:
hapon
Show
(afternoon)
Show
hapon
Show
(Japan)
Show
Glottal Stop
When a vowel has a glottal stop, the sound ends abruptly, like in English after the uh in the
word exclamation uh - oh. There are two places where glottal stops occur. First, they may occur in the last letter of a word if the word ends in a vowel. Not all words ending in vowels have glottal stops, so in new vocabulary for this book, they will be denoted by an accent mark. These are not denoted in native material:
hindí
Show
(no)
Show
walá
Show
(nothing)
Show
Second, when there are two or more adjacent vowels in a word, all of them will have a glottal stop except the last one. These don’t need to be denoted, since they always occur:
oo
Show
(yes) sounds like ó + o
Show
taon
Show
(year) sounds like tá + on
Show
Alphabet
A alcohol
Show
aso (dog)
Show
B boy
Show
bukid (farm)
Show
D dog
Show
dito (here)
Show
E elephant
Show
eroplano (airplane)
Show
G game
Show
galing (skilled)
Show
H heart
Show
halos (almost)
Show
I it
Show
ibon (bird)
Show
K karate
Show
keso (cheese)
Show
L like
Show
lang (only)
Show
M mom
Show
mabuti (fine)
Show
N name
Show
na (already)
Show
O old
Show
oo (yes)
Show
P pin
Show
pero (but)
Show
R *
Show
rep (fridge)
Show
S so
Show
suká (vinegar)
Show
T tall
Show
tamá (correct)
Show
U destitute
Show
ulo (head)
Show
W way
Show
walá (nothing)
Show
Y yes
Show
yaya (nanny)
Show
* There is no English equivalent, but it’s the same as the Spanish single R. It sounds a bit like the dd in ladder if that helps.
Variations – when i comes at the end of a word, it can be pronounced more like a Tagalog e; k can sound a bit raspy at times
.
Loan letters C, F, J, Q, V, X, Z sometimes appear, and they are normally pronounced the same as their English counterparts.
Spanish loan letter Ñ sometimes appears in place of the Tagalog ny:
Ñ canyon
Show
niña (girl)
Show
Combination letters
DIY/DY jam
Show
diyan (there)
Show
NG sang
Show
ngayon (now)
Show
NIY/NY canyon
Show
niya (his/hers)
Show
SIY/SY shot
Show
siya (he/she)
Show
TS chill
Show
tsaka (furthermore)
Show
Variations – diy, niy and siy can also be pronounced as their individual letters, or somewhere in between. For example, diyan can be pronounced as jan, di-yan or jyan. The i can also be dropped from the spelling.
Spanish combination LL sometimes appears in place of the Tagalog ly
[note : this is just a small general observation, but I sometimes felt a little confused over the presentation of uppercase and lowercase phonemes - perhaps using some form of styling (e.g., bold, italics, color, etc.) or the traditional /b/, /t/, etc. format might make everything a bit clearer here]:
LL all-year
Show
Villalobos (a Spanish surname)
Show
Names of letters
The names of letters A thru Z and combination letters are the same as English. Ñ is pronounced the same as Spanish (enye).
Special words
NG is a combination letter, but there is also a word spelled the same way.
ng
Show
is pronounced nang (and roughly means of)
Show
mga
Show
is another special word, pronounced manga (a grammatical word used to make plurals)
Show
Posted

Comment(s)

Thanks for the corrections. Regarding the upper case/lower case comment, did you mean that having it upper case on the left and lower case on the right was confusing, or did I miss your point? Also, what is the "traditional /b/, /t/ et. format"?
Posted 
I meant that sometimes uppercase letters are used to indicate sounds, while other times lowercase letters are used instead. I initially assumed that you were using uppercase letters for foreign sounds and lowercase letters for native Tagalog sounds. However I found this the other way round in one or two places, e.g., "It sounds a bit like the dd in ladder" [foreign], capital letters in the main Alphabet table [this looks good in the table however!] It will probably be easier for readers if you stick consistently to one format throughout the book. The other idea was to highlight phonemes in sentences to help them pop and stand out from the rest of the words when discussing pronunciation. You could do this (and maybe you have elsewhere, as I haven't read any further yet) by changing the font for these letters in some way (e.g., bold, italic, different color), or alternatively by using traditional linguistic formats such as placing speech sounds between obliques/slashes or square brackets, e.g., /b/, [b] (although technically speaking, I think square brackets are used for more detailed narrow transcription).
Posted 
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