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Tagalog Grammar Lite Appendix D Numbers

Appendix D - Numbers
Tagalog speakers use numbers from Tagalog, Spanish and English. Although certain groups of people have preferences of which numbers to use, there is a lot of variation so it’s impossible to give you accurate guidelines.
For example, the year is usually said in English, the time is often said in Spanish, and I hear a lot of counting done in Tagalog, but any of these can be interchanged. One thing most native speakers agree upon is that English numbers are most often used in general.
However, to help you understand numbers when you hear them I encourage you to learn them and use them. Here are the number of tables for your convenience. I recommend you make a pass at memorizing them here as soon as you encounter them in a lesson.
Don’t be concerned if they don’t stick well at first; there will be a lot of repetition and they will become automatic eventually. If at any time you’re in doubt, revisit this appendix and review them again.
Pure Tagalog cardinal numbers 1-10
isa
Show
1
Show
dalawa
Show
2
Show
tatlo
Show
3
Show
apat
Show
4
Show
lima
Show
5
Show
anim
Show
6
Show
pito
Show
7
Show
walo
Show
8
Show
siyam
Show
9
Show
sampú
Show
10
Show
Pure Tagalog cardinal numbers 11-19
Notice that labing is placed in front of numbers that start with vowels, and labin with consonants, with the exception of 17 which gets labim.
labing-isa
Show
11
Show
labindalawa
Show
12
Show
labintatlo
Show
13
Show
labing-apat
Show
14
Show
labinlima
Show
15
Show
labing-anim
Show
16
Show
labinpito
Show
17
Show
labinwalo
Show
18
Show
labinsiyam
Show
19
Show
Pure Tagalog cardinal numbers 20-99
Notice that multiples of ten are just the number followed by mpu if it ends with a vowel, and napu with a consonant. Also, o’s turn into u’s. Between the multiples of ten, just add ‘t + number.
dalawampú
Show
20
Show
tatlumpú
Show
30
Show
apatnapú
Show
40
Show
limampú
Show
50
Show
animnapú
Show
60
Show
pitumpú
Show
70
Show
walumpú
Show
80
Show
siyamnapú
Show
90
Show
siyamnapú’t isa
Show
91
Show
siyamnapú’t dalawa
Show
92
Show
siyamnapú’t tatlo
Show
93
Show
Pure Tagalog cardinal numbers 100+
Notice that except for 100, multiples of one hundred are just the number followed by -ng daan if it ends with a vowel, and na raan with a consonant. For numbers over one million just use English or Spanish. For numbers in between multiples, just use the same order you would with English, but add ‘t between the last two numbers.
sandaan
Show
100
Show
dalawang daan
Show
200
Show
tatlong daan
Show
300
Show
apat na raan
Show
400
Show
limang daan
Show
500
Show
anim na raan
Show
600
Show
pitong daan
Show
700
Show
walong daan
Show
800
Show
siyam na raan
Show
900
Show
isang libo
Show
1000
Show
tatlong libo apat na raan siyamnapú’t anim
Show
3496
Show
Cardinal numbers from Spanish 1-10
Notice that while these numbers came from Spanish, pronunciation and spelling are a bit different.
uno
Show
1
Show
dos
Show
2
Show
tres
Show
3
Show
kuwatro
Show
4
Show
singko
Show
5
Show
sais
Show
6
Show
siyete
Show
7
Show
otso
Show
8
Show
nuwebe
Show
9
Show
diyes
Show
10
Show
Cardinal numbers from Spanish 11-19
Notice that while these numbers came from Spanish, pronunciation and spelling are a bit different.
onse
Show
11
Show
dose
Show
12
Show
trese
Show
13
Show
katorse
Show
14
Show
kinse
Show
15
Show
disiseis
Show
16
Show
disisiyete
Show
17
Show
disiotso
Show
18
Show
disinuwebe
Show
19
Show
Cardinal numbers from Spanish 20-99
Between multiples of 10, with the exception of beynte, just add ‘y + number.
beynte
Show
20
Show
beynte uno
Show
21
Show
treynta
Show
30
Show
kuwarenta
Show
40
Show
sinkuwenta
Show
50
Show
sisenta
Show
60
Show
sitenta
Show
70
Show
otsenta
Show
80
Show
nobenta
Show
90
Show
nobenta’y uno
Show
91
Show
Cardinal numbers from Spanish 100+
siyento
Show
100
Show
dos siyentos
Show
200
Show
tres siyentos
Show
300
Show
kuwatro siyentos
Show
400
Show
kinyentos
Show
500
Show
sais siyentos
Show
600
Show
siyete siyentos
Show
700
Show
otso siyentos
Show
800
Show
nuwebe siyentos
Show
900
Show
mil
Show
1000
Show
tres mil kuwatro siyentos nobenta’y sais
Show
3496
Show
Ordinal Numbers
Ordinal numbers are of the type: first, second, third, etc. With the exceptions of first, second, third and last, all you have to do to form an ordinal number in Tagalog is add ika in front of the number:
una
Show
first
Show
ikalawa
Show
second
Show
ikatlo
Show
third
Show
ikaapat
Show
fourth
Show
ikalabinlima
Show
fifteenth
Show
ikatatlumpú
Show
thirtieth
Show
ikasandaan
Show
hundredth
Show
huli
Show
last
Show
Fractions
Tagalog fractions are very rarely used, with the exception of:
kalahatí
Show
half
Show

Edited

Corrections

Tagalog Grammar Lite Appendix D Numbers
Appendix D - Numbers
Tagalog speakers use numbers from Tagalog, Spanish and English. Although certain groups of people have preferences of which numbers to use, there is a lot of variation so it’s impossible to give you accurate guidelines.
For example, the year is usually said in English, the time is often said in Spanish, and I hear a lot of counting done in Tagalog, but any of these can be interchanged. One thing most native speakers agree upon is that English numbers are most often used in general.
However, to help you understand numbers when you hear them I encourage you to learn them and use them. Here are the number of tables for your convenience. I recommend you make a pass at memorizing them here as soon as you encounter them in a lesson.
Don’t be concerned if they don’t stick well at first; there will be a lot of repetition and they will become automatic eventually. If at any time you’re in doubt, revisit this appendix and review them again.
Pure Tagalog cardinal numbers 1-10
isa
Show
1
Show
dalawa
Show
2
Show
tatlo
Show
3
Show
apat
Show
4
Show
lima
Show
5
Show
anim
Show
6
Show
pito
Show
7
Show
walo
Show
8
Show
siyam
Show
9
Show
sampú
Show
10
Show
Pure Tagalog cardinal numbers 11-19
Notice that labing is placed in front of numbers that start with vowels, and labin with consonants, with the exception of 17 which gets labim.
labing-isa
Show
11
Show
labindalawa
Show
12
Show
labintatlo
Show
13
Show
labing-apat
Show
14
Show
labinlima
Show
15
Show
labing-anim
Show
16
Show
labinpito labimpito
Show
17
Show
labinwalo
Show
18
Show
labinsiyam
Show
19
Show
Pure Tagalog cardinal numbers 20-99
Notice that multiples of ten are just the number followed by mpu if it ends with a vowel, and napu with a consonant. Also, o’s turn into u’s. Between the multiples of ten, just add ‘t + number.
dalawampú
Show
20
Show
tatlumpú
Show
30
Show
apatnapú
Show
40
Show
limampú
Show
50
Show
animnapú
Show
60
Show
pitumpú
Show
70
Show
walumpú
Show
80
Show
siyamnapú
Show
90
Show
siyamnapú’t isa
Show
91
Show
siyamnapú’t dalawa
Show
92
Show
siyamnapú’t tatlo
Show
93
Show
Pure Tagalog cardinal numbers 100+
Notice that except for 100, multiples of one hundred are just the number followed by -ng daan if it ends with a vowel, and na raan with a consonant. For numbers over one million just use English or Spanish. For numbers in between multiples, just use the same order you would with English, but add ‘t between the last two numbers.
sandaan
Show
100
Show
dalawang daan
Show
200
Show
tatlong daan
Show
300
Show
apat na raan
Show
400
Show
limang daan
Show
500
Show
anim na raan
Show
600
Show
pitong daan
Show
700
Show
walong daan
Show
800
Show
siyam na raan
Show
900
Show
isang libo
Show
1000
Show
tatlong libo apat na raan siyamnapú’t anim
Show
3496
Show
Cardinal numbers from Spanish 1-10
Notice that while these numbers came from Spanish, pronunciation and spelling are a bit different.
uno
Show
1
Show
dos
Show
2
Show
tres
Show
3
Show
kuwatro
Show
4
Show
singko
Show
5
Show
sais
Show
6
Show
siyete
Show
7
Show
otso
Show
8
Show
nuwebe
Show
9
Show
diyes
Show
10
Show
Cardinal numbers from Spanish 11-19
Notice that while these numbers came from Spanish, pronunciation and spelling are a bit different.
onse
Show
11
Show
dose
Show
12
Show
trese
Show
13
Show
katorse
Show
14
Show
kinse
Show
15
Show
disiseis
Show
16
Show
disisiyete
Show
17
Show
disiotso
Show
18
Show
disinuwebe
Show
19
Show
Cardinal numbers from Spanish 20-99
Between multiples of 10, with the exception of beynte, just add ‘y + number.
beynte
Show
20
Show
beynte uno
Show
21
Show
treynta
Show
30
Show
kuwarenta
Show
40
Show
sinkuwenta
Show
50
Show
sisenta
Show
60
Show
sitenta
Show
70
Show
otsenta
Show
80
Show
nobenta
Show
90
Show
nobenta’y uno
Show
91
Show
Cardinal numbers from Spanish 100+
siyento
Show
100
Show
dos siyentos
Show
200
Show
tres siyentos
Show
300
Show
kuwatro siyentos
Show
400
Show
kinyentos
Show
500
Show
sais siyentos
Show
600
Show
siyete siyentos
Show
700
Show
otso siyentos
Show
800
Show
nuwebe siyentos
Show
900
Show
mil
Show
1000
Show
tres mil kuwatro siyentos nobenta’y sais
Show
3496
Show
Ordinal Numbers
Ordinal numbers are of the type: first, second, third, etc. With the exceptions of first, second, third and last, all you have to do to form an ordinal number in Tagalog is add ika in front of the number:
una
Show
first
Show
ikalawa
Show
second
Show
ikatlo
Show
third
Show
ikaapat
Show
fourth
Show
ikalabinlima
Show
fifteenth
Show
ikatatlumpú
Show
thirtieth
Show
ikasandaan
Show
hundredth
Show
huli
Show
last
Show
Fractions
Tagalog fractions are very rarely used, with the exception of:
kalahatí
Show
half
Show
Posted

Comment(s)

Sharp eyes man - thanks!
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