Me Familia

Posted

Spanish


Me amore mi familia. No puedo vivo sin mi esposo y mi la ninas. Estoy muy feliz porque yo tengo una familia.

Translation:

I love my family. I can't live without my husband and my girls. I'm very happy because I have a family.

Wow! I'm glad for you Edz. You are so blessed to have them. :)

Posted

Corrections


Me Mi Familia
Me amore Yo amo a mi familia. No puedo vivo vivir sin mi esposo y mi la ninas mis niñas . Estoy muy feliz porque yo tengo una familia.

Translation:

I love my family. I can't live without my husband and my girls. I'm very happy because I have a family.
Posted
I'll try to make a post about "me" and "mi" today :)

Posted

Thanks.. I'm always torn between the two.. haha

Posted

can you elaborate the use of vivir instead of vivo... and mis ninas, por pavor. gracias.

Posted

"Mis niñas" = "my children/my girls"... "mis" is a possessive adjective (plural) like "my". I'll dare to say that in our sentence structure we do not use a possessive adjective next to an article (I might be wrong, there might be an exception)

Posted

Let me think the "vivir" one a little, to explain myself

Posted

Me Familia
Me amore (Yo) amo mi familia. No puedo vivo vivir sin mi esposo y mi la ninas mis niñas . Estoy muy feliz porque yo tengo una familia.

Translation:

I love my family. I can't live without my husband and my girls. I'm very happy because I have a family.
Posted
I was under the impression that the corrected text (if existing) would show up at the very beginning. So nevermind my correction, because Jess Was Here. The only difference is that in the first correction, "amo a" has been used, while it is "amo" only in the second one. And now I just might add one or two more comments, because of something that hasn't been fully answered yet.

Posted

Now why is it "no puedo vivir" rather than "no puedo vivo"? This is about one verb following another. And at least in any sentence like this one (which starts with a conjugated verb), the second one immediately after it will be in the infinitive. There could be some more detailed and more grammar-esque explanations. But this one is something I simply noticed when I was especially focusing on reading in Spanish (rather than in another idioma). And up to now, this simple information has been enough for me.

Posted

Even if you didn't ask about it, still telling you something else, too :). It isn't ungrammatical at all to say "yo amo". However, you could just keep in mind that adding "yo", "tú", "nosotros / nosotras", and "vosotros / vosotras" often isn't necessary when using a conjugated verb. This is because the verb endings themselves contain enough information on their own. When someone is still using these pronouns in sentences like these, this often would be done for emphasis only. Or (plural only) for the purpose of pointing out if it is about men (or men and women together), or women only. As with the conjugated verbs for "él / ella / usted" and "ellos / ellas / ustedes", it is slightly different. There can be an additional ambiguity sometimes, other than the one about "man or woman"? This is because the 3rd person (singular and plural) is also used for formal speech ("usted" and "ustedes").

Edited